Category: Campus Events

Alumni Adam O’Dell to present Mackin-Mailander Lecture

Adam-ODell-photo-640x0-c-default.jpg

via Clarke University

At 2:00 p.m. on Sunday, April 7th, Adam O’Dell will be conducting a lecture in the Jansen Music Hall at Clarke University. The lecture itself is a part of the Mackin-Mailander Alumni Lecture series, entitled “Writing Home, Wherever It May Be.”

The lecture itself surrounds O’Dell’s emotional journey through music and how his connection to Iowa has shifted and changed as he’s moved from place to place since his graduation in 2015.

“Pieces of music serve as snapshots of the composers’ lives; where they lived, who they knew, what they experienced, and how they responded to these influences,” O’Dell stated in a press release.  “For even the most vagabond composers, the concept of ‘home’ permeates the soul of their work, whether that home is found in people, places, or ideas.”

O’Dell has a number of talents, all of which he has explored in different branches of his career. Whether he be composing, teaching, or performing, O’Dell is fervent in his exploration of different styles, combining genres such as jazz, folk, theatre, and more to create story-like pieces that capture audience’s attention.

Some of the more prominent achievements of O’Dell’s include his international commissions and his work with the Dubuque Symphony Orchestra. More recent commissions include the Altered Sound Duo, the Oklahoma State University Symphony Orchestra, Ensemble 135, Just Duet, Third Inversion Reed Trio, hornist Andrew Pelletier, and the Julien Chamber Choir. O’Dell’s work has also reached international audiences, having been performed in the likes of the UK, the Czech Republic, Russia, and more.

The lecture itself is free to the public and to Clarke students.

Musical Menus is in in full swing

On April 4th and 5th at 6:30pm, Clarke students will be taking part in Musical Menus, a fundraiser that celebrates the work of the drama, music, and theatrical departments. Throughout the two nights, many students, as well as Clarke ensembles, will be performing a variety of songs coming from the jazz era.

Kylie Gougler, a visiting professor and head of the vocal performance program, described Musical Menu’s as a way to not only fundraise as a program, but to give back to the community.

“In general, Musical Menu’s is really just a way for us to showcase Clarke University’s musical department and the talent that we have on campus,” says Gougler.

“This year, I’ve decided to change the program a little bit because it’s Clarke’s 175th year, and my first year here, so I wanted to put a fresh little spin on it. In the past this performance has been a lot of solo performances, and I wanted to include a lot of group performances with an overarching theme. I was watching Urinetown last semester and then it came to me— 1920’s jazz.”

Influenced by Gershwin and Cole Porter, Gougler searched through a number of popular composer’s repertoires. Finding pieces for bands, choruses, and solo performers alike, students have begun rehearsing, running musical numbers and blocking their performances. The show itself has an overarching narrative theme, according to Gougler, and the set itself will follow the pace of dinner.

“Every single course in the meal has its own theme. The first is getting around New York City, the second is the trials and tribulations of Love, the third is an illustration of how great love can be, and the fourth is a hodgepodge of fun and witty songs that are reflective of the era.”

Despite being new at Clarke University, Gougler has invested plenty of effort into this fundraiser. “I’ve chosen all the music, I made all the cuts, I assigned all the singers their repertoire, I’m going to be doing some very minimal staging for the show, and I’m also spearheading a silent auction and working with marketing and advertising to get our show out to the community so we have as many patrons here as we can.”

To fill the seats at Musical Menus, and to experience a show the likes of which you haven’t seen before, pre-order tickets right now. If you are looking to come to this event, please email Dora Serna at Dora_Serna@clarke.edu.

 

 

by Dane Shaull

Clarke women’s basketball team to head to NAIA Divison I tournament

With the winter season wrapping up, the basketball season is wrapping up as well, and our Clarke basketball teams have had amazing season this year. As Clarke students, we wanted to acknowledge the great achievements that our men’s and women’s teams have accomplished in this basketball season.

2018_19_clarke_women_basketball.jpg

It was recently announced that the women’s basketball team would be going to the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics, or the NAIA, Division I Nationals. The girls had a recent loss in the Heart of America Basketball Championships in the semifinals during their game against William Penn University, so the recent news of their place in the national competition is exhilarating. Our girls are sitting right now with a record of 21-11, 14-10 in the conference. They have also gone down as having the most wins in program history. The girls will start the NAIA Nationals on March 14 against Columbia.

Our boys have also had an amazing year. After coming back from a loss to Benedictine College in the Heart of America Men’s Basketball semifinals, the boys are finishing the season with a record of 16-16, 13-11 in conference. Losing only by 2 points in their last game with a score of 72-74, the men were on a 5 game win streak before their loss. With no announcements yet of the NAIA DI Nationals for men’s basketball, it looks like they have a pretty good chance at being brought in to participate.

Here at the Crux, we wish our girls and boys the best of luck for the rest of the season, as well as in seasons to come.

 

by Dane Shaull

Don’t wait to see Waiting for Godot

From March 7th to the 10th, the Clarke University Drama and Musical Theater Department will be performing Waiting for Godot by Samuel Beckett at Terence Donaghoe Hall. The show features a five person cast, including students Jamese Kane, Kayla Winandy, Riley Beckett, Alannah Walker, and alumnus Colin Muenster (‘08).

Waiting for Godot is, according to director Joe Klinebriel, a piece of work that belongs to the “Theatre of the Absurd.” According to the notes included in the shows program, the term was coined by Martin Esslin in his 1962 book of the same title. Essentially, absurdist theatre is a form of drama that is meant to call attention to the absurdity of human existence.

Screen Shot 2019-03-06 at 11.36.49 PM

“It’s essentially two men waiting for this fictional character named Godot who never comes,” says Klinebriel of the production. “But what it’s really about is what we do to validate our existence in the meantime. The games we play, the things we do, the relationships that we have and that we form to help us figure out what it is that we’re doing while we’re passing our time.”

The subject and plot of the play may seem abstract and difficult to understand– but that, according to Klinebriel, was Beckett’s point. “He was very particular about silence and timing and the use of language, but he won’t answer too many questions. People always want answers to this play, and I think they’re going to bring their own meaning to it.”

Riley Beckett, a senior at Clarke University who is currently pursuing a degree in drama, says that the particulars of the play were gratifying, though difficult.

“The experience for me was challenging because, during the time my character is onstage, he doesn’t speak very much, so my performance was mostly physical,” says Beckett of his rehearsal experience. “For the lines that the character does have, I had to do a lot of reading and research to figure out what exactly the character was saying and why. The language was difficult to grasp at first because it’s very different from what I’m used to and Samuel Beckett’s use of language is very creative and unique.”

Thankfully, the cast itself is very small, giving Klinebriel a lot of time to work intimately with the actors and crew on the construction of the show.

“Whenever I get an opportunity to work with a smaller group of actors or people it’s a much more intimate experience,” says Klinebriel. “In an educational setting, it’s even that much more fulfilling for me and the actors because there’s just more devoted time between me and them.”

To see the Clarke Drama Department in action, come attend Waiting for Godot on either Thursday, Friday, or Saturday at 7:30 p.m. or Sunday, March 10th at 2:00 p.m. Tickets prices are $10 for general admission, $7 for seniors, and $5 for non-Clarke students. Students of Clarke University can attend for free. All tickets will be available at the door.

 

 

by Charlotte Rodewald

Clarke University announces new president, Dr. Thom D. Chesney

On February 26th, Sister Joanne Burrows announced Dr. Thom D. Chesney as the new president of Clarke University. Burrows, who has been the president of Clarke University since 2006, announced she was going to be retiring from her position in July of 2018. Her announcement sparked a nationwide search and concluded with a unanimous vote from the Board of Trustees, electing Chesney as the 16th president of the university.

Thom Chesney photo

via Clarke University

According to a biography issued by Clarke University, Dr. Thom Chesney previously held the position of president at Brookhaven College of Dallas, TX. He also maintained a number of administrative positions at other surrounding universities and colleges around Texas. Among these are The University of Texas (UT) at Dallas, vice president of academic affairs and provost of Collin College, and additional faculty and administrative roles at UT Dallas, Pennsylvania College of Technology, Texas Wesleyan University, and Whitman College. Chesney earned a doctor of philosophy in English literature, a master of arts in creative writing, and a bachelor’s degree in Spanish.

His background has been a positive point of discussion among many members of the Clarke community. Some students have expressed excitement about his involvement in liberal arts programs. The press release issue by Clarke University also revealed that Chesney’s wife, Noelle, is also deeply involved in the arts—holding a doctorate of musical arts in vocal performance.

Hannah Ingles, a junior at Clarke who is currently studying Graphic Design, said, “I think his leadership has the potential to bring about some exciting opportunities for some of the arts programs at Clarke. I’m really excited to see what changes he makes in promoting programs like mine. I hope he’ll be an advocate for the fine arts—all of them.”

In Chesney’s time at Brookhaven, he attempted to encourage student enrollment, retention, and graduation rates. Additionally, according to Clarke University’s press release announcing his appointment, Chesney has also been a reliable and active member of his community. He served on the board of the Metrocrest Chamber of Commerce, which named him 2014 Citizen of the Year, and also took part in a number of other community programs.

Dr. Thom Chesney, along with his wife, Noelle, and two kids, Drew and Ellen, will be joining the Clarke community July 15th. Sister Joanne has stated that there are a few things she wants to complete before making her departure this summer, but is overall happy to pass the torch to Dr. Thom Chesney.

 

by Dane Shaull

 

Midterm elections end November 6th. Make your voice heard– go vote!

Election season is once again upon us. While the hype around the Midterm election is not as massive as that of the Presidential election, voting is nonetheless extremely important. Not only is voting an integral part of the American democratic experience—it also allows citizens to make their voices heard in the context of greater government decisions. November 6th is the last day Iowans are able to cast their votes for their governor, attorney general, secretary of state, treasurer, auditor, secretary of agriculture, and house representatives. Will you be at the polls?

Currently, the political sphere is riddled with unease—the tension between parties higher than ever. This 2018 election could either make—or break—the nation’s political stability. Some are hoping for a blue wave, citing that it might add balance back into the political system. Others are hoping that the election turns out red, which would make Republicans the majority in the United States government.

Regardless of what party you may align with, it’s extremely important that we as citizens practice the right to vote. Some countries have major limits on citizen participation within the government. However, in the United States, we are given the chance to express our opinions—to cast our votes and influence the turnouts of major political decisions.

The last day to vote in the Midterm election is Tuesday, November 6th. However, if you have not yet filled out an absentee ballot or if you have not yet registered to vote, have no fear. Dubuque voters are allowed to register the day of the election. Just bring a valid Iowa Driver’s license or another picture ID with proof of your permanent address. Additionally, polling stations will allow absentee ballots which have not been posted in the mail to be brought in and counted at the station.

In regards to location, Dubuque voters are able to fill out their ballots at the Election Annex on 75 Locust Street. Clarke students can also vote at the city’s 9th and 10th precinct polling place, Westminster Presbyterian Church, located at 2155 University Ave. If you happen to be a commuter, you can also use this resource to find out what precinct you belong to and which polling place aligns with your address.

Voting is a fundamental right, one that should be exercised whenever possible. You have the chance to make your voice heard, so use it! Go out and vote tomorrow, and wear your “I Voted” sticker proudly!

 

By Mimi Ottavi

 

Raising Student Involvement

Student involvement at Clarke has been at a significant low for a couple of years. The students on Clarke’s campus are rising in number, but that doesn’t mean that student involvement is gaining any traction. By boosting student involvement, it’s possible that students would be more willing to consider the campus home.

Sydney Eustice, president of the Clarke Student Association, says that “One of the goals of the CSA is to help student organizations get more students to attend events.” She believes that, as a campus, “We need to get rid of the stigma that student athletes don’t have time to join in the student organizations events or other sporting events. “ Sydney also mentioned that the Clarke Student Association has meetings every other Sunday hold discussions regarding campus life and the steps CSA can take to help improve it. She says that all students are welcome to join these meetings to present new ideas.

Roane Hand, primary contact of the Spanish club, agrees, stating that “Giving students somewhere to go makes them want to come, which can up the stakes of encouraging them to join.”  Roane elaborated on how she, as a club leader, gets word out about student organizations like the Spanish club. “The only real way to get more students involved is word-of-mouth or face-to-face. It’s a lot harder to tell someone no to their face. If they do say yes and then they don’t show up, you know their face, so when you see them in the hall it can create an awkward situation.”

A resident assistant, Lexi Wenz, had plenty to say not only on student involvement, but the overall environment of Clarke University. Wenz said of the school that “Last year, it felt like this school was a suitcase school. Students lived here during the week, but then left on the weekends. I guess that in my first two years, the Clarke Activity Board had events every weekend or they were more planned out. The chalkboard in the tunnel between Mary Ben and Mary Jo always had weekly events.” As a resident assistant, Lexi gets a different opportunity to get students involved. Lexi says she normally tries to update her residents by letting them know when and where events are happening on campus or in the city.

 

Every week, campus engagement also sends out an email covering the weekly events taking place on and off campus. Most students find this to be helpful, allowing them to plan their schedules accordingly with the addition of events they’d like to attend. In regards to how else to get the word out about campus events, students have been pushing to better utilize the chalkboard in the tunnel between Mary Ben and Mary Jo.

While the university doesn’t make the student, the students definitely make the university. Clarke for a few years now has had a significantly low rate of student involvement, which has impacted the overall environment of Clarke University. Hopefully, over the next couple of months, students will become more aware of what opportunities Clarke has to offer, both on and off campus.

 

Morgan Foster

Fall Into Art 2018!

On Friday, October 5th, a wide variety of art students from nearly every department showcased their work at the Smokestack in downtown Dubuque. The event, entitled Fall Into Art, is an annual art show that strives to present the newest or most coveted work done by those pursuing art majors and minors. From graphic design to abstract sculpture, the pieces being shown illustrate a number of ideas and concepts. 

IMG_2911.jpg

Clarke President Joanne Burrows and Professor Jessie Rebik observe student work displayed at the Smokestack.

Hannah Ingles, a junior graphic design major at Clarke, displayed a redesign of a vintage matchbox cover. The project was originally assigned as a means of challenging students to re-conceptualize and modernize old outdated advertisements. Hannah’s work, which depicted the brand Scissor Safety Matches, featured a number of textures and detailed, Victorian era ornamentation. 

Ingles Redesign-02

Piece by Hannah Ingles

In addition to a number of printed graphic design pieces, a series of full body drawings were displayed, having been completed in a life drawing class from the 2018 spring semester. Charlotte Rodewald, a junior graphic design major, presented a depiction of a skeleton, showing her ability to accurately portray different perspectives of the human body. 

“The assignment really helped me understand how the body moved,” said Rodewald of her piece. “It’s so important to understand where certain bones and muscles are [as an artist].” 

If you want to see new student work, keep an eye out for art department events around campus. From December 5th to February 28th, sophomore and junior art students will be having their review, exhibiting their pieces in the Quigley Gallery at Clarke University. 

To keep up to date on any events hosted by the Clarke Art Department, click here

 

 

Feelings of Neglect Among Pride

Is Clarke University considering anything and everything for its athletics? Some students on campus, specifically student athletes, feel as though their respective sports are being overlooked by administration, thus, making them feel unimportant.

Decorated teams like Baseball, Softball, and Track and Field all been competing off campus since each of their inaugural seasons. Baseball competes at A.J. Spiegel Park in Peosta which is about a 20-minute drive. Softball competes at Veteran’s Memorial Park which is a 7-minute drive, and Track and Field have never even had home field advantage as they are always on the road. These teams, along with two Lacrosse teams, two Golf teams, two soccer teams, and potentially our new football team will have to share one indoor facility throughout the year, the Gantz Center, which is also a 7-minute drive from campus. Clarke does not provide transportation to these off-campus facilities.

Baseball, Softball, and Track and Field have been exceptionally successful in the past few years; however, a number of student-athletes feel as though they have nothing to show for it.

Clarke-University-1024x458

Photo Credit: College Consensus 

Campus is changing, and some concerns are coming to light. There is little word from the administration regarding what exactly these new facilities are going to look like. Students can visibly see the plethora of space there is on campus, and that there is a lot of room for possible facilities for sports that seem to have been forgotten.

In a conversation with All-American baseball player, Michael Lopez, a junior from Rancho Cucamonga, California, he expresses his discontent with the current facilities stating, “I feel like our team is consistently successful, however we still get the short end of the stick having to drive 20 minutes to practice every day. A lot of us are from far away states and don’t have cars at our disposal.”

Lopez continues with expressing frustration stating, “It just sucks because student-athletes work as hard as we can to represent Clarke and what has Clarke done for us? Now that they are taking trees down, I can see that there is definitely room on campus for a baseball field or even an Avila type facility which is a full length make-shift football field, soccer field, softball field, and baseball field…I know I am not alone by saying there is room for this type of facility at Clarke.”

Clarke softball players also express their frustration and feelings of neglect. Ally Renforth explains the softball field is less than conducive for competition and practice, “…we have to haul all of our equipment from Gantz to [Veteran’s Memorial Park] to the school. It’s a constant struggle having to chase down equipment.”

Renforth continues to express her frustrations with the actual field, “We play at a community field. Kids ride their bikes across it and even run onto our field during practice. We have to put up a fence in order for our field to be regulation, we have an extremely small dugout for our team, and we have a scoreboard with broken pegs for plastic numbers that fall off. In all of my four years of college softball we are the only team I’ve seen with less than satisfactory facilities like ours.”

Renforth continues to state, “don’t get me wrong, we are content with the facilities that we have, but now that Clarke is making new facilities for a team that doesn’t even exist yet, it kind of hurts feeling as though we have been totally forgotten about.”

In closing with Lopez he expressed, “Clarke is doing a lot of things right, but they are also doing a lot wrong. The university should be caring thoughtfully about their current students and student-athletes because we are the best chance they have at generating donors. Instead, most of us are unhappy and envy schools like Georgia Gwinnett, University of Dubuque and the facilities that many teams in our conference have. I understand sports aren’t everything in life, but Clarke is wasting the chance to bring a championship culture across all sports to campus.”

Personally being affected by this, it seems like Clarke is jumping the gun on some of the decisions they make. This article is not meant to be taken offensively. I think Coach Regalado is doing a great job recruiting a team and getting the Clarke community excited about football. Administration is doing a great job in supporting football on the Clarke campus. The soccer and lacrosse teams are all equally deserving of benefiting from these future facilities. All of these things aside, it still doesn’t hide the fact that current student-athletes feel neglected for a shiny new object when they have put in the blood, sweat, and tears in order to make their sports worthy of respect.

 

By: Jamie Deering

#ClarkeToo

Since the social media campaign spark in October 2017, the #MeToo movement hits close to home with members of the Clarke community. They hope Clarkies will participate in the upcoming “Denim Day” on April 26th.

The #MeToo movement spread across the United States when actor Harvey Weinstein was accused by several women in Hollywood of sexual assault. Within hours, women were posting on their social media accounts “#MeToo,” showing that they too are survivors, and support the awareness of sexual abuse. For some Clarke University students, faculty, and staff, the media outburst ignited conversation of just how often sexual assault happens.

Picture1.jpgTriston King, Assistant Director of Engagement and Intercultural Programs at Clarke University, says it is time to take action on such a prevalent issue in today’s society. “If you are looking at the #MeToo campaign as a shift in culture, as something where people look at this and say, ‘Oh my gosh! Today forty women that I know on my Facebook feed posted this.’ Think about that. Think about how many women you have on your profile. Think about the ratio of women you have who actively post and that you pay attention to.”  This was a personal driving force for King. He suggests that the real way to make a cultural shift is to raise awareness for the issue.

Renee Dionisio, student, had similar ideas as King. Together, they decided to sit at a table in Clarke’s atrium and start the conversation in late November. Dionisio sat at the table with small pieces of paper and a box, prompting members of the Clarke community to write either #MeToo or #IHave. “A lot of people did not know what it was, so I had to explain it to them. I could tell they were uncomfortable to even write #MeToo or even #IHave.” The table was set up for two weeks. Dionisio recalls, “It was hard until one person came and wrote #MeToo. She told me her story and was very wide open with it.” For her, this moment and an encounter she had with a faculty member put things into perspective.

metoo-2859980_1920After the fourteen days were up, the slips were posted on a wall in the Fabiano conference room at Clarke. In the end, about forty slips were turned in and hung on the wall. A majority of these slips read #MeToo, and about a third of those had stories attached to them. A conversation took place at 7 p.m. on November 20 in the conference room.

King says that these were posted on the conference room wall for two reasons. Firstly, King said it gave those survivors a voice that they deserve. He told members of the Clarke community, “We want you to feel completely free to write down everything and anything that happened to you.” This allowed students to write anonymously so they would not have to hold back any details. It also gave other students an opportunity to see just how many people are affected by this issue in just the Clarke community.

“In the moment is where we want change,” King states. He suggests to the people who are in fear of coming forward to, first, remove yourself from the situation. However, King insists that you must do something about it in order to create change. “If you know something is happening but you are afraid to say anything, call someone you trust. Call campus security. Call the police. Do whatever you feel is necessary.” Dionisio also wants to remind students that even if you are unsure, there will be consequences to those perpetrators.

Dionisio and King also would like to let the Clarke community know about the upcoming “Denim Day” on April 26. Students are encouraged to wear denim to show support and solidarity for those who are survivors of sexual violence.

Clarke students are encouraged to also use the support systems on and off campus. Both the counseling center and campus ministry are not required to report cases of sexual violence, however, resident advisors, student employees, and faculty members are mandatory reporters. The Riverview Center is also a great source for students who want to talk with people who share the same experiences or discuss policies of sexual misconduct. If you or someone you know is a survivor of sexual assault, the number for the 24-Hour Sexual Assault Hotline is 888-557-0310.

By Emily Boge