Category: Clarke News

Fall Into Art 2018!

On Friday, October 5th, a wide variety of art students from nearly every department showcased their work at the Smokestack in downtown Dubuque. The event, entitled Fall Into Art, is an annual art show that strives to present the newest or most coveted work done by those pursuing art majors and minors. From graphic design to abstract sculpture, the pieces being shown illustrate a number of ideas and concepts. 

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Clarke President Joanne Burrows and Professor Jessie Rebik observe student work displayed at the Smokestack.

Hannah Ingles, a junior graphic design major at Clarke, displayed a redesign of a vintage matchbox cover. The project was originally assigned as a means of challenging students to re-conceptualize and modernize old outdated advertisements. Hannah’s work, which depicted the brand Scissor Safety Matches, featured a number of textures and detailed, Victorian era ornamentation. 

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Piece by Hannah Ingles

In addition to a number of printed graphic design pieces, a series of full body drawings were displayed, having been completed in a life drawing class from the 2018 spring semester. Charlotte Rodewald, a junior graphic design major, presented a depiction of a skeleton, showing her ability to accurately portray different perspectives of the human body. 

“The assignment really helped me understand how the body moved,” said Rodewald of her piece. “It’s so important to understand where certain bones and muscles are [as an artist].” 

If you want to see new student work, keep an eye out for art department events around campus. From December 5th to February 28th, sophomore and junior art students will be having their review, exhibiting their pieces in the Quigley Gallery at Clarke University. 

To keep up to date on any events hosted by the Clarke Art Department, click here

 

 

Feelings of Neglect Among Pride

Is Clarke University considering anything and everything for its athletics? Some students on campus, specifically student athletes, feel as though their respective sports are being overlooked by administration, thus, making them feel unimportant.

Decorated teams like Baseball, Softball, and Track and Field all been competing off campus since each of their inaugural seasons. Baseball competes at A.J. Spiegel Park in Peosta which is about a 20-minute drive. Softball competes at Veteran’s Memorial Park which is a 7-minute drive, and Track and Field have never even had home field advantage as they are always on the road. These teams, along with two Lacrosse teams, two Golf teams, two soccer teams, and potentially our new football team will have to share one indoor facility throughout the year, the Gantz Center, which is also a 7-minute drive from campus. Clarke does not provide transportation to these off-campus facilities.

Baseball, Softball, and Track and Field have been exceptionally successful in the past few years; however, a number of student-athletes feel as though they have nothing to show for it.

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Photo Credit: College Consensus 

Campus is changing, and some concerns are coming to light. There is little word from the administration regarding what exactly these new facilities are going to look like. Students can visibly see the plethora of space there is on campus, and that there is a lot of room for possible facilities for sports that seem to have been forgotten.

In a conversation with All-American baseball player, Michael Lopez, a junior from Rancho Cucamonga, California, he expresses his discontent with the current facilities stating, “I feel like our team is consistently successful, however we still get the short end of the stick having to drive 20 minutes to practice every day. A lot of us are from far away states and don’t have cars at our disposal.”

Lopez continues with expressing frustration stating, “It just sucks because student-athletes work as hard as we can to represent Clarke and what has Clarke done for us? Now that they are taking trees down, I can see that there is definitely room on campus for a baseball field or even an Avila type facility which is a full length make-shift football field, soccer field, softball field, and baseball field…I know I am not alone by saying there is room for this type of facility at Clarke.”

Clarke softball players also express their frustration and feelings of neglect. Ally Renforth explains the softball field is less than conducive for competition and practice, “…we have to haul all of our equipment from Gantz to [Veteran’s Memorial Park] to the school. It’s a constant struggle having to chase down equipment.”

Renforth continues to express her frustrations with the actual field, “We play at a community field. Kids ride their bikes across it and even run onto our field during practice. We have to put up a fence in order for our field to be regulation, we have an extremely small dugout for our team, and we have a scoreboard with broken pegs for plastic numbers that fall off. In all of my four years of college softball we are the only team I’ve seen with less than satisfactory facilities like ours.”

Renforth continues to state, “don’t get me wrong, we are content with the facilities that we have, but now that Clarke is making new facilities for a team that doesn’t even exist yet, it kind of hurts feeling as though we have been totally forgotten about.”

In closing with Lopez he expressed, “Clarke is doing a lot of things right, but they are also doing a lot wrong. The university should be caring thoughtfully about their current students and student-athletes because we are the best chance they have at generating donors. Instead, most of us are unhappy and envy schools like Georgia Gwinnett, University of Dubuque and the facilities that many teams in our conference have. I understand sports aren’t everything in life, but Clarke is wasting the chance to bring a championship culture across all sports to campus.”

Personally being affected by this, it seems like Clarke is jumping the gun on some of the decisions they make. This article is not meant to be taken offensively. I think Coach Regalado is doing a great job recruiting a team and getting the Clarke community excited about football. Administration is doing a great job in supporting football on the Clarke campus. The soccer and lacrosse teams are all equally deserving of benefiting from these future facilities. All of these things aside, it still doesn’t hide the fact that current student-athletes feel neglected for a shiny new object when they have put in the blood, sweat, and tears in order to make their sports worthy of respect.

 

By: Jamie Deering

Connect and Serve

There is a small group of students on Clarke’s campus who participate in a program that is not widely known by other students. This program, “Connect and Serve,” began in the spring semester of 2016, and consists of Clarke students partnered with students just across the street at Dubuque Senior High School. These Clarke students mentor the Senior High School students through a program adapted from the University of Minnesota’s Check and Connect program which works to improve the graduation rates among high school students.

This semester, eight Clarke University mentors were each paired with at least one Dubuque Senior High School student and met weekly with their mentees. We developed academic goals to improve grades through academic supports, improved behavior at school, improved the students’ attitudes towards academics. Of these eight Clarke students, four are volunteers and the other four are in the “Connect and Serve” course instructed by Clarke Sociology Professor Rachel Daack. This one-credit hour course meets once a week to discuss each mentee’s progress in the program and to provide support and ideas that can improve the mentoring experience and outcomes of the high school student mentees. Clarke students also explore social research and participate in community organizations with goals similar to Connect and Serve.

Clarke University hosted a visit event on campus this spring semester for the Senior High mentees. The student mentees ate lunch in the cafeteria with their mentors, toured campus, and participated in a Q & A with Clarke mentors about college life. The high school students thoroughly enjoyed the unlimited lunch buffet in Clarke’s dining hall (especially the ice cream sundae bar), the opportunity to see a dorm room, and hearing from their college mentors about what college life is like in comparison to high school. Many of the student mentees left campus with new considerations of attending college after high school and programs they may be interested in participating in. Overall, the event successfully opened the student mentees’ eyes to life beyond high school, which has in turn motivated the students to do well in school in order to attend college after graduation. The mentoring program will continue into next year as new mentors are being recruited in order to grow the program.

 

By: Caroline Herrig

Lack of Health Insurance Causes Crime and Crushes Dreams of College Athletics

After bartending for over 20 years, a woman we will be referring too as Kay, suffers of shooting pains up and down her arms, pinching in her wrists, and numbness in her hands; she suffers from severe arthritis. Due to not having medical insurance, Kay took matters into her own hands by smuggling Oxycodone in her bags after a trip to Mexico.

This shows the lengths United States citizens will go to find treatment or care if they are without healthcare. Those that cannot afford health care

“Look, I am a bartender and I will be for the rest of my life. It is just too easy not to do! My child gets sick all of the time and I have this issue with my hands. We go down there [Mexico] every year, it’s just too easy to pass up”, Kay said.

The main reason for the smuggling was because of the prices of Oxycodone, or any other non-over-the-counter medications in the States.

If healthcare were to be more affordable for the single mother of three she would consider getting a plan. She does not qualify for Medicare or Medicaid.

Kay told reporters, “They [Doctors] tried charging me 70-80 bucks a bottle? I buy 20 dollars’ worth in Mexico and I’m set for the year”.

According to HealthCare.gov, the lowest premium rate in the state of Iowa costs $429.69 if you are over the age of the 50. That is without monthly costs and deductibles.

Kay’s daughter is a student at NICC. After graduating at Senior High, she planned on attending Clarke University and wanted to continue her bowling career to the collegiate level.

“They [Clarke] told me I was not able to compete or attend because we didn’t have health insurance to cover for any accidents or injuries… Yeah, it was upsetting but I got over it quick”, Kay’s daughter said.

According to the Clarke University website, “All Clarke students must be covered by health insurance… Clarke University does not endorse a specific student insurance plan”. This is due to the Affordable Care Act.

However, the website does list a number of options and suggestions of different health insurance company’s students can contact.

According to Clarke Health Services Nurse, Tammy Moore, states, “The complicated part about health care is that everyone’s situation is different. But, all students are able to be seen here. We are limited to what we can do, so usually if they [students] need further care and have issues with parents’ plans or they are out of network, we send them to Hillcrest or Crescent Community Health Center”.

Although all situations are different, health insurance is something that is supposed to help us, not harm us. Some benefit, while others actually struggle more because of their lack in coverage.

“It wasn’t always this way”, Moore says, “We used to accept students onto campus whether they were insured or not. But it all falls back on liability”.

For now, campuses like Clarke University are doing their best to provide quality healthcare to all students, despite economic differences regarding health insurance opportunities.

 

By: Cassidy Derus

 

 

 

#ClarkeToo

Since the social media campaign spark in October 2017, the #MeToo movement hits close to home with members of the Clarke community. They hope Clarkies will participate in the upcoming “Denim Day” on April 26th.

The #MeToo movement spread across the United States when actor Harvey Weinstein was accused by several women in Hollywood of sexual assault. Within hours, women were posting on their social media accounts “#MeToo,” showing that they too are survivors, and support the awareness of sexual abuse. For some Clarke University students, faculty, and staff, the media outburst ignited conversation of just how often sexual assault happens.

Picture1.jpgTriston King, Assistant Director of Engagement and Intercultural Programs at Clarke University, says it is time to take action on such a prevalent issue in today’s society. “If you are looking at the #MeToo campaign as a shift in culture, as something where people look at this and say, ‘Oh my gosh! Today forty women that I know on my Facebook feed posted this.’ Think about that. Think about how many women you have on your profile. Think about the ratio of women you have who actively post and that you pay attention to.”  This was a personal driving force for King. He suggests that the real way to make a cultural shift is to raise awareness for the issue.

Renee Dionisio, student, had similar ideas as King. Together, they decided to sit at a table in Clarke’s atrium and start the conversation in late November. Dionisio sat at the table with small pieces of paper and a box, prompting members of the Clarke community to write either #MeToo or #IHave. “A lot of people did not know what it was, so I had to explain it to them. I could tell they were uncomfortable to even write #MeToo or even #IHave.” The table was set up for two weeks. Dionisio recalls, “It was hard until one person came and wrote #MeToo. She told me her story and was very wide open with it.” For her, this moment and an encounter she had with a faculty member put things into perspective.

metoo-2859980_1920After the fourteen days were up, the slips were posted on a wall in the Fabiano conference room at Clarke. In the end, about forty slips were turned in and hung on the wall. A majority of these slips read #MeToo, and about a third of those had stories attached to them. A conversation took place at 7 p.m. on November 20 in the conference room.

King says that these were posted on the conference room wall for two reasons. Firstly, King said it gave those survivors a voice that they deserve. He told members of the Clarke community, “We want you to feel completely free to write down everything and anything that happened to you.” This allowed students to write anonymously so they would not have to hold back any details. It also gave other students an opportunity to see just how many people are affected by this issue in just the Clarke community.

“In the moment is where we want change,” King states. He suggests to the people who are in fear of coming forward to, first, remove yourself from the situation. However, King insists that you must do something about it in order to create change. “If you know something is happening but you are afraid to say anything, call someone you trust. Call campus security. Call the police. Do whatever you feel is necessary.” Dionisio also wants to remind students that even if you are unsure, there will be consequences to those perpetrators.

Dionisio and King also would like to let the Clarke community know about the upcoming “Denim Day” on April 26. Students are encouraged to wear denim to show support and solidarity for those who are survivors of sexual violence.

Clarke students are encouraged to also use the support systems on and off campus. Both the counseling center and campus ministry are not required to report cases of sexual violence, however, resident advisors, student employees, and faculty members are mandatory reporters. The Riverview Center is also a great source for students who want to talk with people who share the same experiences or discuss policies of sexual misconduct. If you or someone you know is a survivor of sexual assault, the number for the 24-Hour Sexual Assault Hotline is 888-557-0310.

By Emily Boge

Pet Therapy Now Offered Twice a Week

At Clarke University, students now have the option to attend Pet Therapy two times a week, which can help reduce stress and anxiety.

In previous semesters, Pet Therapy met once a week on Wednesdays from 3 p.m. to 4 p.m. Due to popular demand, Pet Therapy now meets twice a week on Tuesdays and Wednesdays from 3 p.m. to 4 p.m., giving students more options to attend.

“Pet Therapy is now two days instead of one by popular demand by Clarke students” the student organizer of Pet Therapy, Laura, explained. “We put a vote on the university’s Twitter asking which day of the week students would prefer for another pet therapy slot, and the majority answered Tuesday. So, now it’s Tuesdays and Wednesdays, which is convenient for students who might be busier on one of those days, but still want to see a dog that week.”

dogIn further conversation, Laura stated, “Pets just make me feel calm and loved, and it’s so rewarding to love them back. They’re always a nice de-stressor because all they expect from you is pats and treats.”

“It makes me feel at home” Alex, a Clarke student explained. “Pets are a part of most people’s lives and helps many of us feel better overall. When I go to Pet Therapy, I can forget about all of my school work for the time being. I get to enjoy good company and the pets help reduce my stress levels.”

Laura explained her motivations for organizing Pet Therapy. “I understand how important it is for students to have a break throughout their week. Schoolwork and jobs and life can be insane, and I know how refreshing it is to look forward to an event that doesn’t involve high stress or responsibility.”

Multiple students explained that they can get more homework accomplished later by attending Pet Therapy after a day of classes.

“It gives our brains a rest after long hours of lectures in our classes. We get to de-stress while petting these pets and all of our worries temporarily go away” explained Kelsey, another Clarke student.

Many students agreed that being able to pet a dog in the middle of the day is a de-stressor and positive experience.

“The Pet Therapy program was something I had loved about Clarke since freshman year. I would make an effort every week to try and see the dog that was coming” Laura said. “Taking time, even if it’s just passing by on the way to your dorm room, to pet a happy dog is just so calming. Pet therapy can even be the highlight of someone’s day.”

“I’m glad Pet Therapy is now offered on Tuesdays. I always had a class from 3 to 4:15 on Wednesdays and never got the option to attend. Now I can attend on Tuesdays when I don’t have a late class” Alex explained.

As a consensus, students at Pet Therapy on Tuesday agreed that Pet Therapy was a way to break up their long day of classes and the homework that had to be done that night.

 

By: Kelli Peterson

 

*Pictures curtsey of Kelli Peterson and Clarke University

Yesterday, I Walked Out.

I’m writing this because I’m mad.

On Tuesday morning at 10am, a group of us in the Clarke community stood outside in the 30 degree weather. I was surrounded by students, professors, staff, BVMs, and even local Dubuquers. I should feel a sense of happiness to see this group standing up. But I’m not. I’m mad.

I’m angry that this has to happen. I’m angry with myself that there are students my age and younger in fresh plots of grave and I am here complaining about the cold. I’m mad at you, the gunman. How could you?

I’m mad at those who won’t listen to us. I’m pissed at the people who won’t take a call to action. I’m angry that the crowd who showed up on campus was so small.

I’m mad because there have been 14 school shootings this year and it’s only March (CNN).

I’m done just “keeping the victims and families in my thoughts and prayers.” We need action. We need change now. This can’t keep happening.

You may be wondering, why did I even attend the Walkout if I’m so upset about needing one in the first place?

That’s exactly why I’m here. I can’t keep letting this get pushed into the nooks and crannies of my brain, feeling sad for a day and then moving on.  Did the victims get to move on?

I’m saddened that there were so few who joined this powerful moment, today. I know it’s cold. I know it’s midterms and we are overwhelmed and busy. I know we don’t have time to give. That’s the point. We don’t have the time, we have things to do, but we pause. We walk out anyway. We take a stand. I want my voice to be heard. I want all of our student voices heard. We are smart, fierce, passionate, and fearless.

I looked around the small crowd and I saw anger, I saw tears, I saw passion, and I saw fear. I hope this leads to something more. I don’t want another shooting to just become a dusted over book, a vague memory of what once was. I don’t want to forget. As one woman in the crowd reminded us, “It wasn’t always like this. It doesn’t have to be like this.” There was silence and then applause and understanding from the crowd.

After the walk out, some of us chose to join in a small group discussion in the Fabiano conference room. We were faced with the questions, “What do you think we should do about gun violence?” and, “How can we prevent gun violence here at Clarke University?”

I had plenty of thoughts, comments, stories, and examples to share. But, I had no answer. We all had great discussions and conversations, shared worries, views, and connected with each other…But, we had no answer. Maybe part of the answer we are looking for is to start talking and listening to each other. We need to take the time to check in with one another; don’t let people get lost in the crowd. We need to listen to others’ stories, concerns, and worries. We all have something to say, so please, listen to us.

 

Source: https://www.cnn.com/2018/03/02/us/school-shootings-2018-list-trnd/index.html

 

By: Megan Kane

CUDM Kicks Off Year 3

By: Caroline Herrig

Dance Marathon is an organization that supports the University of Iowa Stead Family Children’s Hospital, and this is Clarke’s third year of hosting their own Dance Marathon event.

This organization works throughout the school year to raise funds and awareness for the hospital, and at the end of the year at the “big event”, the total amount of money raised is revealed to all of the members and dancers who helped raise it! In the past two years, Clarke Dance Marathon, an entirely student-run organization, has raised over $25,000 and with that money, was able to purchase a prep/recovery room at the hospital that is named after Clarke’s program.

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Kaitlynn Pate, one of CUDM’s Co-Presidents, expressed how critical each and every member and dancer is to the success of the organization.

“It is amazing to me that college students can make such an impact on the lives of those treated at the University of Iowa Stead Family Children’s Hospital. We are all part of a movement that is larger than all of us participating combined. We are the face to end pediatric illness,” Pate stated.

This year, the organization has been especially busy with fundraising, as the goal this year is to raise $20,000, all of which goes directly to the hospital to provide things like meal tickets for families during their stay, toys/gifts for the kids, as well as funding for research for pediatric illnesses.

The executive committee has also been working to ensure the big event runs smoothly, and has been working to schedule entertainment for the event such as dodgeball, karaoke/lip sync battles, minute-to-win-it games, a bounce house, Zumba, therapy dogs, plus more! All of these activities are free for Dance Marathon committee members and dancers to participate in. The only hard part, is that there is no sitting or caffeine allowed during the 8 hour event. This is a way for the Dance Marathon members to take on the struggles that the kiddos at the hospital regularly face.

Most importantly, at the big event, the miracle families that are the face of the Clarke Dance Marathon program are given the opportunity to share their stories of their experiences with the hospital for all of the members and dancers to hear. These stories are shared throughout the event to serve as a reminder of what all of the hard work is for. Chelsea Pierce, CUDM’s Family Relations Director, stated, “I have never met and gotten to know stronger families than our CUDM miracle families. They let our organization into their lives and let us become a part of their families. They share with us their difficult times, and our organization helps life them up.”

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CUDM’s big event is held on Saturday, April 14th from 4 pm – midnight, and is held in the Kehl Center on campus. Dancers can still register for the event, and donations can be made now, through the duration of the event. If you would like to register, donate, or learn more about Dance Marathon and the University of Iowa Stead Family Children’s Hospital, you can visit clarke.edu/dancemarathon.

A Fresh Look at the Tenth Muse

The Tenth Muse, Clarke’s literary magazine, is revamping its brand this year, as the staff puts together the eighth volume of the magazine. Professor Emily Goodmann has taken the reigns on the project, with help from editor-in-chief, Jenna Weber, a sophomore here at Clarke University. Changes will be seen this year in brand, logo, and overall tone of the Tenth Muse. It’s a very exciting time for the Tenth Muse staff.

Weber took some time to reflect on her experience with the Tenth Muse, thus far. She explained to me, “My role as an editor started last year when, as a freshman, I agreed to do an internship with the professor who was the previous faculty advisor of the magazine. I was interested in taking the class after getting my first poem published through the Tenth Muse but was the only student who signed up for the course in the Fall 2017 semester.”

Weber then goes on to say, “However, I was still determined and excited to be a part of this literary magazine at Clarke. After this professor left, I took the course with Emily Goodman and worked one-on-one with her on understanding copyediting, improving my skills in this field, and learning how to serve as a positive leader.”

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I then asked Weber about her experience as the editor-in-chief position. She said, “The experience as Editor-in-chief has been challenging and rewarding as I learn more every day about the publishing process as well as what it means to be a part of a literary magazine. I am and always will be passionate about the Tenth Muse and its mission.”

The Tenth Muse supports the creativity of Clarke students and among any creative minds wanting to submit their work for publication, and sharing it with the local community.

Weber’s final remarks were, “I plan to keep working with others to expand its voice across the Clarke campus as well as the Dubuque community. I look forward to the changes this magazine will go through and hope those who follow the Tenth Muse share in my excitement.”

Now, with 5 students on staff, and the hard work and dedication of Emily Goodmann and Jenna Weber, the process of putting together and publishing the magazine is underway. Clarke University is proud of all the students who submitted and contributed to the making of the Tenth Muse, and we all should give some thanks to ambitious, dedicated students like Jenna Weber, who has kept the Tenth Muse alive, fresh, and better than ever.

The Tenth Muse will launch in late spring at the Tenth Muse’s launch party. Details to follow from the staff at the Tenth Muse.

 

By: Megan Kane