Category: Clarke News

Yesterday, I Walked Out.

I’m writing this because I’m mad.

On Tuesday morning at 10am, a group of us in the Clarke community stood outside in the 30 degree weather. I was surrounded by students, professors, staff, BVMs, and even local Dubuquers. I should feel a sense of happiness to see this group standing up. But I’m not. I’m mad.

I’m angry that this has to happen. I’m angry with myself that there are students my age and younger in fresh plots of grave and I am here complaining about the cold. I’m mad at you, the gunman. How could you?

I’m mad at those who won’t listen to us. I’m pissed at the people who won’t take a call to action. I’m angry that the crowd who showed up on campus was so small.

I’m mad because there have been 14 school shootings this year and it’s only March (CNN).

I’m done just “keeping the victims and families in my thoughts and prayers.” We need action. We need change now. This can’t keep happening.

You may be wondering, why did I even attend the Walkout if I’m so upset about needing one in the first place?

That’s exactly why I’m here. I can’t keep letting this get pushed into the nooks and crannies of my brain, feeling sad for a day and then moving on.  Did the victims get to move on?

I’m saddened that there were so few who joined this powerful moment, today. I know it’s cold. I know it’s midterms and we are overwhelmed and busy. I know we don’t have time to give. That’s the point. We don’t have the time, we have things to do, but we pause. We walk out anyway. We take a stand. I want my voice to be heard. I want all of our student voices heard. We are smart, fierce, passionate, and fearless.

I looked around the small crowd and I saw anger, I saw tears, I saw passion, and I saw fear. I hope this leads to something more. I don’t want another shooting to just become a dusted over book, a vague memory of what once was. I don’t want to forget. As one woman in the crowd reminded us, “It wasn’t always like this. It doesn’t have to be like this.” There was silence and then applause and understanding from the crowd.

After the walk out, some of us chose to join in a small group discussion in the Fabiano conference room. We were faced with the questions, “What do you think we should do about gun violence?” and, “How can we prevent gun violence here at Clarke University?”

I had plenty of thoughts, comments, stories, and examples to share. But, I had no answer. We all had great discussions and conversations, shared worries, views, and connected with each other…But, we had no answer. Maybe part of the answer we are looking for is to start talking and listening to each other. We need to take the time to check in with one another; don’t let people get lost in the crowd. We need to listen to others’ stories, concerns, and worries. We all have something to say, so please, listen to us.

 

Source: https://www.cnn.com/2018/03/02/us/school-shootings-2018-list-trnd/index.html

 

By: Megan Kane

CUDM Kicks Off Year 3

By: Caroline Herrig

Dance Marathon is an organization that supports the University of Iowa Stead Family Children’s Hospital, and this is Clarke’s third year of hosting their own Dance Marathon event.

This organization works throughout the school year to raise funds and awareness for the hospital, and at the end of the year at the “big event”, the total amount of money raised is revealed to all of the members and dancers who helped raise it! In the past two years, Clarke Dance Marathon, an entirely student-run organization, has raised over $25,000 and with that money, was able to purchase a prep/recovery room at the hospital that is named after Clarke’s program.

Processed with VSCO with p5 preset

Kaitlynn Pate, one of CUDM’s Co-Presidents, expressed how critical each and every member and dancer is to the success of the organization.

“It is amazing to me that college students can make such an impact on the lives of those treated at the University of Iowa Stead Family Children’s Hospital. We are all part of a movement that is larger than all of us participating combined. We are the face to end pediatric illness,” Pate stated.

This year, the organization has been especially busy with fundraising, as the goal this year is to raise $20,000, all of which goes directly to the hospital to provide things like meal tickets for families during their stay, toys/gifts for the kids, as well as funding for research for pediatric illnesses.

The executive committee has also been working to ensure the big event runs smoothly, and has been working to schedule entertainment for the event such as dodgeball, karaoke/lip sync battles, minute-to-win-it games, a bounce house, Zumba, therapy dogs, plus more! All of these activities are free for Dance Marathon committee members and dancers to participate in. The only hard part, is that there is no sitting or caffeine allowed during the 8 hour event. This is a way for the Dance Marathon members to take on the struggles that the kiddos at the hospital regularly face.

Most importantly, at the big event, the miracle families that are the face of the Clarke Dance Marathon program are given the opportunity to share their stories of their experiences with the hospital for all of the members and dancers to hear. These stories are shared throughout the event to serve as a reminder of what all of the hard work is for. Chelsea Pierce, CUDM’s Family Relations Director, stated, “I have never met and gotten to know stronger families than our CUDM miracle families. They let our organization into their lives and let us become a part of their families. They share with us their difficult times, and our organization helps life them up.”

IMG_4678

CUDM’s big event is held on Saturday, April 14th from 4 pm – midnight, and is held in the Kehl Center on campus. Dancers can still register for the event, and donations can be made now, through the duration of the event. If you would like to register, donate, or learn more about Dance Marathon and the University of Iowa Stead Family Children’s Hospital, you can visit clarke.edu/dancemarathon.

A Fresh Look at the Tenth Muse

The Tenth Muse, Clarke’s literary magazine, is revamping its brand this year, as the staff puts together the eighth volume of the magazine. Professor Emily Goodmann has taken the reigns on the project, with help from editor-in-chief, Jenna Weber, a sophomore here at Clarke University. Changes will be seen this year in brand, logo, and overall tone of the Tenth Muse. It’s a very exciting time for the Tenth Muse staff.

Weber took some time to reflect on her experience with the Tenth Muse, thus far. She explained to me, “My role as an editor started last year when, as a freshman, I agreed to do an internship with the professor who was the previous faculty advisor of the magazine. I was interested in taking the class after getting my first poem published through the Tenth Muse but was the only student who signed up for the course in the Fall 2017 semester.”

Weber then goes on to say, “However, I was still determined and excited to be a part of this literary magazine at Clarke. After this professor left, I took the course with Emily Goodman and worked one-on-one with her on understanding copyediting, improving my skills in this field, and learning how to serve as a positive leader.”

download.jpg

I then asked Weber about her experience as the editor-in-chief position. She said, “The experience as Editor-in-chief has been challenging and rewarding as I learn more every day about the publishing process as well as what it means to be a part of a literary magazine. I am and always will be passionate about the Tenth Muse and its mission.”

The Tenth Muse supports the creativity of Clarke students and among any creative minds wanting to submit their work for publication, and sharing it with the local community.

Weber’s final remarks were, “I plan to keep working with others to expand its voice across the Clarke campus as well as the Dubuque community. I look forward to the changes this magazine will go through and hope those who follow the Tenth Muse share in my excitement.”

Now, with 5 students on staff, and the hard work and dedication of Emily Goodmann and Jenna Weber, the process of putting together and publishing the magazine is underway. Clarke University is proud of all the students who submitted and contributed to the making of the Tenth Muse, and we all should give some thanks to ambitious, dedicated students like Jenna Weber, who has kept the Tenth Muse alive, fresh, and better than ever.

The Tenth Muse will launch in late spring at the Tenth Muse’s launch party. Details to follow from the staff at the Tenth Muse.

 

By: Megan Kane

A Delicious and Melodious Night in Japan

By Maggie Christianson

On October 25th, 2017 the Edward and Cathy Gallagher Arts at Clarke series hosted A Night In Japan in Jansen Music Hall. The event, starting at 7:00pm,  began with music ensembles from Clarke under the direction of Andrew Alegria and David Resnick and concluded Tsukasa Taiko’s Japanese drumming performance.  Alongside these acts, the series provided food options ranging from sushi to matcha white chocolate mousse before the event at 6:30 in the Atrium.

My adventure to A Night In Japan started when I arrived at the Atrium with an empty belly, ready to enjoy some sushi, only to discover the long line almost headed down the hall. It felt like forever, but once I received my plate, I grabbed as much food as I could. I tried everything they had, from veggie and tuna sushi to their dumplings filled with delicious pork.

For dessert, the staff had prepared a creme cheesecake puffball and white mousse. I wasn’t a huge fan of the cheesecake, which was perfect for my friend, Mariah, who attended the concert with me because she fell in love with the flavor. I really enjoyed the mousse. It had the texture much like frosting and a sweet flavor that wasn’t too rich, making it easy to enjoy.

After finishing our dish, some friends and I headed into the Jansen Music Hall and found ourselves right in front. The wind ensemble started off the 1st act by beautifully performing Japanese folk songs. My personal favorite was Fantasy on a Japanese Folk Song by Samuel Hazo.

The 1st act continued with Sharon Jensen playing Hanawa- Saku (Flower will Bloom) by Yoko Kanno, on the piano. Following her was Cantabile, singing two songs, Nanatsu No Ko, a Japanese Children’s Song, and Sakura Sakura- arranged by Douglas E. Wagner. All the students and professors did an amazing job performing all these beautiful Japanese songs and created a great beginning to this wonderful night.

The 2nd Act was performed by Tsukasa Tako. Here is where they performed on the taiko drums and showed the different festival performances the drums were used for. Part of the show was demonstrating the movements of the beating of the drums which I found very memorizing. The speaker was very engaged with the audience, telling us stories about the music and how he started this group.I was amazed by the classical dance, getting to listen to live music as well as watching a dancer perform to said music.

 

I honestly enjoyed my evening. It was overall a great experience, from the delicious food to the wonderful music. I feel that whether someone went only for the food or the music, everyone found something to enjoy, as I heard nothing but good things about the night.

.

Men’s and Women’s Cross Country Express Optimism for Conference and Great Overall Season

By Mariah Pellino

They have been running fast, training hard, and preparing all season for their upcoming meet. The Clarke Men and Women’s Cross Country teams are awaiting the most anticipated race of their season: conference.

Their conference meet will take place on November fourth in Baldwin City Kansas. The results of this meet decide what teams and individuals will continue their seasons onto Nationals or which will come to an end. Although the meet is fast approaching, the anticipation of this meet has been building up over the course of many months for both the men’s and women’s team.

IMG_2099
Photo courtesy of Coach Brooke Ferguson

All sixteen cross country runners, under the coaching of Brooke Ferguson, have raced at five other competitive meets. These meets include: The Mustang Gallop, Luther All-American, Brisman-Lundeen Invite, Loras Invite, and their most recent race the Seminole Stampede.

The women’s team most impressive finish being 6th out of 17 teams at the Brisman-Lundeen Invite. The team, led by the strong junior Lauren Block, finished with a total of 188 points to earn them their impressive 6th place finish. Block placed 9th overall with a 5k time of 20:41. The second runner for the team was freshman Lauryn Pritchard running a time of 22:05 and was followed closely by junior Emily Reisenberg at 22:06. Sophomore Alex Branham finished in fourth for the Clarke pack coming in at a time of 23:26. The other contributors were freshman Mariah Pellino, senior Anna Cole, and freshman Annie Knobloch. The eighth member of the team, Sydney Hendricks did not race because of an illness.

Although Lauren Block had a great finish and an overall large contribution to the teams 6th place finish at the Brisman-Lundeen Invite, this isn’t the only accomplishment we have seen from Block this season.

This is Block’s first season back after time off from an injury. She reflects back on her achievements thus far:

“I think as an individual, finishing my first race was a turning point within itself. Being injured for over a year, I never thought the day would come where I could actually run a race, and placing made it even more bittersweet”

The first meet of the season, The Mustang Gallop, was were Block first individually placed this season, placing 9th out of 74 runners. Additionally to this 9th place finish, Block has also placed: 6th, 9th, and 19th at the team’s other competitive meets.

It is with the help of the team that Block has made these accomplishments. She is not alone in the outstanding efforts that have been put in by runners this season. Each and every member of the women’s and men’s team have been working hard the entirety of the season, pushing themselves in every race and at every practice.

 

IMG_2211.JPG
Photo courtesy of Katie

 

Block agreeably states that it is through teamwork that the team has come this far and is going to be prepared for, conference.

“As a team, we are all so encouraging of each other on and off the course. No matter a good workout or bad, we’re always there keeping each other’s spirits up. Cross country is a hard sport, and add in the factors of being a college student, the stress levels can reach an all-time high. By making sure we’re all mentally and physically ready to race, we can ensure a successful conference race”.

The men’s team has also had their fair share of accomplishments this season. Their best finish as a team was also at the Brisman-Lundeen Invite. They finished 11th out of 22 teams with a total of 312 points. Coming in first for the Pride was senior Malik McCrary with a 6k time of 22:36. Close behind him was junior, Logan Fraker running a time of 22:59. Sophomore, Mike Aguilar took the third place finish for the team’s pack, finishing at a solid 23:44. The fourth finisher for the men’s team was sophomore Kevin Ockenfels running a time of 24:26. The other contributors to the team’s strong finish were freshmen Jimmy Slowik, Devin Dobbles, and Reide Gallaway. The eighth member of the team, Craig Stout, who has been battling minor injuries, did not participate in this race.

The Clarke men’s cross country team has shown tremendous progress over the span of this cross country season. A lot of their success this season can be credited to the growth in members for the men’s squad.

 

2017_18_clarke_men_cross_country
Photo courtesy of Clarke’s Athletic Website

 

Back in 2015, the Clarke men’s cross country team consisted of only five members, which is just enough for them to race as a team. Since 2015, the men’s teams roster has grown to a total of eight members. This is a major positive change for the team as Stout adds:

“The team has gotten bigger. The more guys we have on a team, the more successful we will likely be. It’s nice going into practice knowing you have to bring your A game or you’ll get left behind”

They will be able to use this new advantage of more members to push one another during their next conference meet in a way they are not able to do previously. With only five runners in 2015, each member counted for the team’s score. Now they have to work together and push themselves to be in the top five that scores for the team.

With the anticipation at an utmost high, the excitement to see what the men and women’s cross country team will accomplish at their conference meet is overwhelming.

 

IMG_2084.JPG
Photo courtesy of Katie 

 

For some, this will be their last conference meet in their collegiate running careers. This goes for the seniors Anna Cole, Sydney Hendricks, Malik McCrary, and Craig Stout.

Hendricks reflected on her last four years as a runner and shared what she is thinking as her days as a college cross country runner nears to an end:

“I want to finish the season and my career strong. But I know I’ll be participating in races after XC and am excited to start that part of my running career. I will miss my teammates tremendously though. They make the hard days easier.”

Undoubtedly the women’s and men’s team will miss the efforts, positive energy, and dedication that the senior members offer.

Embracing their accomplishments and remembering how far they have come, both teams are more than ready for their conference meets. Coach Brooke Ferguson talked about her goals for the teams as they get ready for conference. She hopes that both teams continue to pack run, work up during their races, and finish in the top half of the conference meet.

Hendricks shared what she would want to say to her team in regards to conference,

“I would tell them to run our best, have confidence in ourselves, and leave it all on the course. At the end of the race all that truly matters is that we ran our hardest and gave it all we had.”

Zoey Weber: Saving Lives in Texas

zoeySummer of 2017 seems like a distant memory now, doesn’t it? We’ve already been back in school for a few weeks and loaded with homework. But some of us worked hard all summer too, furthering our education for our future careers. I’ll admit I enjoyed many days with my toes dipped in the pool and soaking up the sun. My dear friend, Zoey Weber, a student of the class of 2018, was busy saving lives. She made the move to Texas this summer to further her nursing skills and training with a summer internship. Let’s take a look at what she has to say about her experience.

She told me how growing up in Dubuque area and being familiar with the resources around her gave her the opportunity to work at Finley Hospital as a tech in the Family Birthing Suites since high school. She loves the environment she works in and plans to be a labor and delivery nurse at a larger hospital in Texas after graduation. Her dream is to continue her education and become a midwife.

Zoey loves Dubuque, however, she personally feels she would gain more experience in a big city like Dallas or San Antonio. The state of Texas is very dear to her heart. In hopes of pursuing this dream, Zoey applied for multiple nursing internships for the summer of 2017 in Texas. After a little bit of the waiting game, she received a call from St. Luke’s Hospital offering her an interview for a nursing internship. Zoey made the journey to Texas and had a successful interview. She got the internship! The internship was nine weeks long at CHI in St. Luke’s Hospital, which is considered the largest medical center in the United States. She split her time working with a nurse preceptor on the surgical floor and working in the ICU during the second half of the internship.

The excitement, nerves, and readiness for this new adventure filled her. Immediately she began looking for apartments or places to stay. The scary part for her was that she didn’t know many people in Texas and realized she was really her my own making adult decisions. Perhaps she didn’t find the nicest place of them all to stay, but thankfully her best friend gave me a care package with scorpion spray to ward off any creepy crawlers who might want a place to stay in Zoey’s apartment.

Another new experience and somewhat of a challenge for Zoey was the public transportation. The hospital did not have parking for its employees, which meant she would be taking the public train system to and from work. Although public transportation is beneficial, she witnessed some interesting events on the train rides that she does not want to see again.

Maybe there were a few setbacks and things to adjust to, but the internship provided Zoey with such a life-changing education and experience. Who knew one could learn so much over the course of nine weeks? Because she worked in labor and delivery back home, she felt nervous being placed in the oncology unit for the first half of the internship. This hospital, being a medical center, has many trials and many basics that she will need for a career. Zoey expressed how she felt so lucky to be able to learn in this setting. She got to place IVs every day, drew the entire floors lab work every morning, did lots of dressing changes, and much more.

The absolute craziest moment of this internship was when one of Zoey’s patient’s heart stopped while she was alone with the patient! Zoey calmly called a code to get help, but still needed to resuscitate the man with the help of two other CNAs while they waited for the doctor to arrive. They had the patient back to life before the doctor arrived, and it was the most intense moment of Zoey’s nursing career thus far.

Her internship also took a change of course this summer. She planned on moving to the ICU for the second half of the internship, but due to matters out of her control, she instead got offered a position with the rapid response team within the hospital. They assist when there are patients who have heart attacks, strokes, and need resuscitation. So, needless to say, many more intense and educational experiences are now under her belt from the time with the rapid response team.

Zoey is beyond grateful for the experiences she had in Texas at St. Luke’s this summer and learned so much. Now she feels so prepared to do her ER and ICU clinicals with the nursing program at Clarke this fall. There were both trials and tribulations, but she would do this again in a heartbeat. Zoey looks forward to her senior year as a nursing student, and she’s excited to move to Texas after graduation and work as a full-time nurse down south.

Clarke University is proud to have students like Zoey Weber. I am proud to call her my friend.

Unfortunately, right after Zoey returned home from the beautiful state of Texas, Hurricane Harvey hit. It was shocking that the place she lived in all summer and grew to love very much was now under water and mass destruction. If you are interested, please click the link below to donate to the hurricane relief in Texas. Thank you.

https://www.redcross.org/donate/hurricane-harvey

 

By: Megan Kane

Admitted Student Weekend starts with the purpose of financial, educational, and social advancement.

Clarke University, located in Dubuque, Iowa, welcomed future students to attend Admitted Student event in order to receive a scholarship and get a start on their Compass requirements.

Admitted Student Weekend, formerly known as VIEW Weekend, occurs every year during the spring semester of the academic school year at Clarke University. The purpose of these weekends is to provide scholarships to those admitted students who attend and participate in the events of the weekend.

For completing the weekend and participating in the events, each student receives a $1,000 scholarship for the duration of their academics at Clarke University. This gets added to their financial aid package to assist with tuition, fees, room, board, or other expenses.

The events for the weekend focus on providing those students in attendance with opportunities to bond with fellow admitted students, participate in a group activity that will assist them with graduation requirements, and learning more about the institution prior to attending.

The graduation requirements that participants get to start are part of the university’s newly implemented Compass requirement. Kelsey Meyer, the Clarke University Campus Experience Manager, explains, “Compass is a program that allows the individuals on campus to formulate all the activities of a typical Clarke undergraduate into different experiences that translate into life after college.”

For the Compass activity, each group of students is in charge of creating a club on campus that promotes self-sufficiency. This would mean that the primary focus should be on students to provide for themselves and help them after college. This has allowed previous participants to create clubs focused on money management and checkbook balancing.

Although the Compass graduation requirement activity is the primary focus of the event, participants get the opportunity to do more.

The Saturday night of the event, student’s head to the Lion’s Den, the campuses common lounge area, in order to enjoy music, dancing, desserts, and conversation with their peers. This allows the students to socialize and make new friends for the upcoming school year. This has been reported as the place where students meet their future close friends.

“When I attended [Admitted Student Weekend], I ended up making friends with people that I continue to be close to as I am rounding out my college experience,” states senior Delaney Borst.

Admitted Student Weekend is also an event that staff members enjoy. Admissions Visit Intern Joshua Bradshaw, who coordinates the event with the admission’s staff, expressed, “This event is really fun to plan and attend because meeting and talking to new people who will be at Clarke promotes the expansion of Clarke’s community for future generations.”

Admitted Student Weekend is held on three weekends this year with hopes to accommodate the growing interest in the event with perspective students. If you would like to help facilitate groups on future weekends, please contact Kelsey Meyer in admissions.

 

Graduating Art Students Reflect on Their Show and Offer Advice to Future Art Majors

Screen Shot 2017-04-26 at 10.09.45 PMIn February, Clarke University’s Art and Design Department presented the Bachelor of Arts Degree Exhibition where current seniors displayed their newest art pieces. Erik Brolin (Ceramics), Morgan Hazer (Painting), and Hope Greenwood (Painting) have their work displayed in Clarke University’s Quigley gallery until March 8th. The available hours to view the art are 1-5:00 p.m. Monday through Friday and 1-4:00 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday.

Erik Brolin a Graphic Design major with an emphasis in Ceramics stated that, “I had been working on [my pieces] all semester, basically a month and a half”. When asked what had inspired his theme for the project “West Coast Waveware” Brolin said, “Well, I am from the West Coast, Gilroy, California which is in the South Bay of Northern California and the wave aesthetic in my work helped me reflect where I am from.”

Since Brolin is a senior at Clarke and will be graduating this upcoming May he has plans to look for an internship in Graphic Design. At the moment, he is looking for an internship at home in California but he is open-minded.

Additionally, Erik Brolin has a few words for other younger peers in the Art department as well as incoming freshman seeking a degree in the Arts. “If you think it can be better, it can be. Just keep working and don’t give up, you’re going to fail.

Screen Shot 2017-04-26 at 10.10.02 PMArt major, Hope Greenwood, with an emphasis in painting said that,” Planning the idea started last summer. I was taking summer classes and meeting with my professors over the summer.” She decided to be proactive and get some planning for her senior show done in the summer since, “[the seniors] had to come up with three ideas before the [spring] semester started.”

Greenwood discussed her plans after graduation as well, “I am still really open to things, I know I am planning on doing commissions for some digital work, but really just to get a job and work it.” She does not want to rush into graduate school at the moment. She would like to pay off a lot of the student loans she has accumulated during her time at Clarke first.

When asked which professor was a big influential figure throughout her process her answer was, “Jessica Rebik was a lot of help, she helped me with a lot of it.”

Screen Shot 2017-04-26 at 10.09.53 PMOther influences in Greenwood’s work were derived from an Art Department trip to Chicago. “I went to the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago. One of the shows inspired me on how I’m hanging them in the gallery, it was Kerry James Marshall.”

Since Hope Greenwood has been so positively influenced by others in the Art world she would like to give some tips to her younger peers. “Talk to your professors as much as you can and if you’re an actual art major start thinking about your senior show sophomore, junior year […] if an idea comes to your head, write it down.”

Remember to support the Arts at Clarke and your local artists of Dubuque. The available hours to view the art in the Clarke gallery are 1-5:00 p.m. Monday through Friday and 1-4:00 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday.

 

The Results Are In! Meet Your New Representatives in CSA.

On Friday night, April 21st, the elections closed for the CSA Senate race. The newly elected officials on the Executive Board will lead the Clarke Student Association for the upcoming 2017-2018 school year, with the senators representing their individual classes opinions and stances.

There will be a torch passing ceremony taking place at the Honors Dinner on May 5th, from the current senators to the newly elected officials. You can sign up for the Honors Dinner by emailing Lynn Becker at Lynn.Becker@clarke.edu

Here is the new roster for the Executive Board, and your class senators.

Executive Board

President: Kyle Majerus, ‘18

Vice President: Katie Marter, ‘18

Secretary: Laura Naber, ‘18

Treasurer: Bailey Theisen, ‘20

 

Senior Class of 2018

President: Megan Madl

Vice President: Nicholas Anderson

Secretary: Jeff Ruhlow

Treasurer: Matt Gagner

 

Junior Class of 2019

President: Kylee Liginski

Vice President: Sydney Eustice

Secretary: Eric Jones

Treasurer: Caroline Herrig

 

Sophomore Class of 2020

President: Echo DeVries

Vice President: Josh Sanchez

Secretary: Annalise Lyon

Treasurer: Alex Koenig

 

Photo courtesy of Michael Bently via creative commons license.