Category: Lifestyle

To knit or knot to knit?

Life in Apartment 303 can be unexpected.

There are so many different temperaments between me and my five roommates, but we all share similar enough personalities. We are all social creatures, so the apartment is always full. Described by my roommate Lauryn, it’s like “living with a pack of wolves.”

Almost every night, our guy friends visit and do their homework in our living room. These are my favorite moments: coming home to Lauryn sitting in her chair by the, spewing random facts. The guys usually take up the kitchen table, forcing the rest of us to sit on the couch or floor while a show plays softly in the background. It is there that the knitting circle began.

It started back during first semester of sophomore year, when Lauryn had first made her announcement to the apartment about her new hobby. She use to knit back in the day, and had decided she wanted to take it up again. “Okay,” I told her. “Give it a go.”

And she did.

I remember her purchasing all this yarn, starting to roll it into balls, while the boys watched, enraptured. She patiently showed the guys how to properly wrap the yarn tightly. First it was Hayden who helped her, spooling her yarn as Lauryn started to knit. Eventually, Hayden asked to try. Soon after Hayden, Kevin was asking to join, and then several others who decided to take up the hobby.  

It wasn’t long before I found myself coming home to knitting parties in our living room. Our guy friends would sit with Lauryn, all quietly watching the TV as they quietly knitted scarves, headbands, or practiced on the shitty dish towel we had laying around the kitchen.

At first, I wasn’t quite sure what to make of all these guys knitting. I laughed at it at first, seeing these athletic men chilling together with their knitting needles, but I ultimately supported them. They enjoyed it, so what was the harm? As the semester continued, several of the guys moved on from their brief stint with knitting, but at least two of my guy friends continue this hobby. They’ve since bought their own needles, and it’s become routine for them to beg Lauryn and I to pick up rolls of yarn for them each time we make a trip to Joann Fabrics.

This behavior has shaped what I consider my new normal. It would feel odd to walk into a home without the boys sat in the living room, knitting away. Recently, Lauryn and I have joined them once again, picking up a new pastime: embroidery. So now, if a stranger was to walk into our apartment, they would be met with four individuals, knitting and embroidering away like a bunch of elder couples.

The moral of this story, if there is to be one, is to try something new. Regardless of whether it’s a hobby suited to other people’s perception of you, there’s no harm in testing out different hobbies. If you’re interested enough in knitting, give it a try! The world is your knitting circle. You just need to make the first stitch.

 

by Maggie Christianson

Preventing Sexual Violence through Education on Campus

Students at Clarke University, as well as students from all federally funded colleges and universities in the United States, are required to take sexual violence prevention training every year. To comply with the U.S. Department of Education requirements, Clarke provides a mandatory online training course to its students in the fall to be completed by October. The goal of this training, as well as other campus events, is to reduce instances of sexual violence and create a safe environment on campus for all students.

Sexual assault and sexual violence are not topics that college students she away from. Cases like Brock Turner and the Vanderbilt football players in 2015 caused an uproar of anger around the nation about sexual assault on campus and the justice system’s judgement on sexual assault cases. According to RAINN (Rape, Abuse & Incest National Network), 11.2% of all undergraduate and graduate students experience sexual assault during their four years at college1. Clarke is not immune to this problem, even though it is viewed as a small, friendly campus. The online training program, and events like dramatic dialogue during CONNECT weekend, are created to educate students on sexual assault statistics, its implications, and resources available to them on campus. Through preventative education, Clarke works to change the environment on campus so that all students feel safe no matter what.

Education plays a vital role in the prevention of sexual violence on campus. One of the CDC’s five strategies to prevent sexual assault is to teach the skills necessary to prevent sexual violence through different areas of student’s lives2. Learning about healthy relationships and sexuality is one part of the education. For example, students are taught the warning signs of abusive tendencies so they know what to look out for in any kind of intimate or romantic relationships.

Kate Zanger, Vice President for Student Life and Title IX Coordinator at Clarke University, discussed what Clarke is doing to educate its students to prevent sexual violence. “One of the reasons we added the on-line sexual violence education class is to demonstrate that we are reaching students. It is not the only education tool we use. The CONNECT Orientation program for undergraduate students contains information about defining consent, by-stander intervention and our policy and resources including where to make a report and where to access confidential resources.” When asked why an online program, Kate explained that it is the best way to reach the most number of students, and that they have a high response rate. In previous years, Clarke has also asked coaches to require their athletes to attend on-campus events featuring films like “Hunting Grounds” followed a discussion by on- and off-campus personnel. Since Clarke’s student body has many athletes, requiring them to attend an event such as this ensures education is reaching a large percentage of students.

People are increasingly becoming aware of the prevalence and implications of sexual assault on campus. Instructing students regarding their rights and the resources available to them on campus can help victims and eliminate rape culture on campus. On this topic, Kate Zanger reported “I think as a result of our education efforts, we have experienced an increase in faculty, staff and students bringing concerns to me as the Title IX Coordinator for Clarke. I make an outreach to be sure the person knows their options for reporting and resources.” Through education, students can help each other and themselves fight through an impossible situation.

 

[1] https://www.rainn.org/statistics/campus-sexual-violence
[2] https://www.cdc.gov/violenceprevention/sexualviolence/prevention.html

 

by Sydney Young

 

 

How to stay sane in subzero weather

“Baby, it’s cold outside.”

No truer words have ever been spoken. Following two days of subzero temperatures, Clarke has delayed and canceled classes within the second week of school. Due to the fact that there’s no way to go outside without turning into human ice sculpture, we thought we’d give you some ideas of what to do while holed up in your dorm, apartment, or (hopefully) warm home.  Stock up on those canned goods, bundle up in your parkas, and steel yourselves for the cold snap!

  • Movie Marathon: Pop some popcorn, kick back, and relax! Invite friends and roommates, vote on a series, and begin your epic movie marathon.  There are tons of franchises to choose from– from Harry Potter to Marvel, DC to Hunger Games, or, if you’re desperate, Twilight.

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via yonki

  • Read: Yes, people still do that for fun. A good book can teleport you away for hours. Its quick entertainment, and you don’t even need to plug it in to charge! Unless, of course, you read on a tablet or computer. This could be the time to reread books you’d forgotten you loved. Or, if you’re feeling adventurous, take a dive into a new genre! Grab a blanket and a warm drink, curl up in your bed, and get lost in your story.

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via odyssey

  • Game Night: Plug in that Xbox, pull out that game board, and shuffle that deck. Enjoy having a fun night of gaming, whether it’s taking your friends’ cash in a game of poker or battling it out on Fortnite. Unleash your competitive side and play to win!

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via giphy

  • Homework: You laugh now, but getting ahead on your studies will allow you to actually relax in your short time off. Despite the fact that classes were canceled, teachers have been asked to provide work to students that could serve as replacement for class time. Clear up your schedule so you aren’t rushing at the last minute!

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via wheninmanila

  • Art: Dance, sing, paint, draw, knit, or do something else creative! Stop using the left side of your brain for a moment and explore a new way to express yourself. Sometimes, you need to stop thinking so literally in order to allow yourself to see things in a new light. Find friends to be inspired with and see what you can create!

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via giphy

These two days off might not have seemed like much in comparison to the month long vacation of Christmas break, but they’re still a treat! Make sure your time spent indoors isn’t wasted. Stay safe, stay entertained, and above all, stay warm!

 

 

By Maggie Christianson

All I want for Christmas is to pass my exams

Ah, finals week. It’s much liked the countdown to Christmas, but instead of Holiday cheer, students are riddled with sleep-deprivation, over-caffeination, and stress. It’s the magical week where majors of all kinds collectively lose their heads over exams, projects, and papers.

Everyone goes into finals week with a different attitude. Some students may suffer from test anxiety, while others may feel their heartrates pickup at the thought of giving a speech. There are perfectionists and those that go with the flow– optimists, pessimists, and everything in between.

Regardless of what kind of student you may be, whether you strategize your time with amazing restraint—determined to get your work done, even if it means staying up all night every once and awhile—or whether you can’t find it in yourself to stay up past 10 p.m. anymore, it’s important to acknowledge the one variable that unites us all during these trying last few weeks of the semester.

We all care far too much.

We treat our grades and our GPA’s as the end all be all—and, for some of us, they are. These grades are the gateway to our degrees which we need in order to go out into the work force or into a higher degree of study. So, we chug our cups of coffee and energy drinks, we sacrifice our mental health to our textbooks and notes, we go to bed at 3:00 a.m., and we panic all the while about whether or not we’re prepared enough.

The unfortunate truth is that most of us aren’t.

But we can be. Believe it or not, studying works wonders. If you find studying difficult, don’t be afraid to reach out for help. There are a number of different resources available for free use on campus, such as the MARC, the professors, and even other students. It may sound crazy, but everyone wants you to pass just as much as you do.

At the end of finals, when you turn in that last exam, when you give your final presentation, you’re free for the rest of 2018. Sure, you won’t know your grade for some time, but as long as you put in the work and give it your all, it doesn’t matter. You did all you could.

So enjoy your break and scrape together whatever holiday cheer you have left, because you deserve to relax. You worked hard this semester. You deserve this break, because if you’re coming back next semester? Who knows when you’ll get another chance to sleep for an entire month.

Happy Holidays, and Merry Finals!

 

By Maggie Christianson

How long does it take to cook a turkey in the microwave? The answer is: you don’t

Thanksgiving—an entire holiday dedicated to turkey, football, and Macy’s. Since we’re just on the verge of taking a break from school to head back home for the holidays, we thought it’d be appropriate to address the internet’s most recent trend. About a week ago, a new meme emerged on Twitter, highlighting the exasperated nature of mothers nationwide. An enormous number of young adults sent loving messages to their moms asking how they might cook a 25lb Butterball turkey in the microwave. Seems like a fantastic idea, right?

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Via @Cassidy_OMealia

Of course, no young adult is actually attempting to nuke an entire bird till it’s cooked through. This meme is more about the frighteningly similar responses of each of these college student’s mothers. The reactions range from concerned to deeply disappointed.

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Via @russelldpowell

One of our own editors attempted this harmless prank and sent a message to her mom. Only minutes later, our editor was FaceTiming with her mother, receiving a firm reprimand. While there is nothing more powerful than a mother’s love, it seems that a Butterball turkey in the microwave might be the breaking point of a mother’s patience.

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Via @TheClarkeCrux

Have you attempted this viral turkey prank? If so, send us the screenshots of your parent’s responses on Twitter @TheClarkeCrux!

by Staff

Mental Illness in College

We all know that college is a time of new experiences. College is really a test, it gives us a taste of the real world and at some points slaps us with reality. While going through college we learn a lot about ourselves that we didn’t know before, and one of those things is how well we can handle the stress of the real world. With the constant studying, assignments and impending due dates, college students commonly become overwhelmed and cannot handle the pressure of higher education. This can leads to mental health issues.  Mental health is defined as “Emotional, psychological, and social well-being. It affects how we think, feel, and act. It also helps determine how we handle stress, relate to others, and make choices,” (1). Throughout college students will commonly test the limits of their mental health and will potentially end up pushing themselves to the point of developing a mental illness. It is important for students to understand the importance of taking care of their mental health and to know how to when it is time to seek help when they need it.

The most common mental health issues found in college students are suicide and depression, stress and anxiety, addiction, eating disorders, bipolar disorder, ADHD,  and sleep disorders (2). There are many signs that can help determine mental health conditions before they worsen; unusual sleeping habits, low energy and ambition, change in hygiene habits, thoughts of harming yourself or others,  as well as feelings of worthlessness, helpless or hopeless feelings, and changes in appetite. When these signs are experienced its best to reach out to a counselor or advisor to seek help before it gets too out of hand.

An anonymous professor at Clarke University explained that he thought the most strenuous part about being in college that affects mental health is students being on their own. He explained that parents are not teaching kids to function on their own before they are thrown into the complexity of college. He explained that as a parent it is their responsibility early on to teach children the basics of independence. When asked for advice on how to help students deal with the struggles of sustaining mental health he recommended analyzing your week. Most college students when mapping out their week have too much leisure time, do not spend enough time studying or doing homework. For example, if you have four hours of free time, spend two hours studying then play video games. He also said that students feed themselves negative thoughts, in which he provided a hand out which allows for an individual to assess or challenge the negative thoughts in order to prevent them from altering one’s mental health. One would believe that the drop out rate would be high considering the stress that college can put on one with mental health issues, and this professor agrees. He stated that between three and four years ago about 5-10 psychology majors dropped out at Clarke during the spring semester because of depression and anxiety disorders. As a college educator, he has seen students experience mental health issues first hand. In his experience he said the most common signs of mental health issues that he has seen consist of continuous absences from class, late work, previously stellar work to more poor-quality work and the physical appearance of the student is different, students have baggy eyes, poor complexion, look sloppy in overall appearance and lack overall hygiene.

Liz Schuler, a Clarke instructor believes that mental illness is seen as a stigma but has also seen the powerful affects of mental illness. She says that so far from her knowledge about 3 students have already dropped out this semester. What some may find surprising is that Clarke staff do not have to go through training to be informed about mental illness or how to help the students who are struggling.

Mental illness is a neglected topic that most individuals are unknowledgeable about. To those who deal with a mental illness, do not be afraid to reach out, college is a mess sometimes. You shouldn’t have to be. Your mental health is not a stigma, and you are not your mental illness.

By Alexis Decker`

2)“College Student Mental Health.” Psychology, www.learnpsychology.org/mental-health/.

1)“What Is Mental Health?” What Is Mental Health? | MentalHealth.gov,www.mentalhealth.gov/basics/what-is-mental-health.

Top 5 Shows On Netflix You Can Binge Right Now

Too much homework? Need a mental break from all those studies? Well, then take the time to binge a new TV series on Netflix! Regardless of whether you’re mooching off your parents account or if you’ve got your own, here’s a list of the 5 best shows to binge on Netflix when you’re not in the mood to cram.

  1. Grey’s Anatomy- Love drama? How about hot doctors? Well then you have come to the right place. The show follows Meredith Grey, who is starting off as an intern at a hospital in Seattle. Not only do we watch her struggle with maintaining relationships with her colleagues and trying to keep a lid on some family drama, she finds herself in a forbidden romance as well. With 14 seasons posted on Netflix, with number 15 on the way, this show will have you drooling for more.greys-anatomy-memes-long-live-grey-s-5b1ed102fa6bcc0036c4d53b.jpg
  2. Stranger Things- Full of sci-fi and 80s culture, this thriller follows Joyce as she investigates the disappearance of Will, her 12 year old son. As they investigate Will’s disappearance, they come to unravel a series of conspiracies, exposing the details of government experiments and the collusion of supernatural forces.  With Stranger Things seasons 1 and 2 both on Netflix, it will keep you hanging on the edge of your seats. There are, of course, jumpscares. You’ve been warned.1464696-strangerthings-1500797978-936-640x480.jpg
  3. Daredevil- Are you a Marvel fan but you can’t wait for the next Marvel movie? Daredevil is the perfect watch for breaks between films. It will also get you hooked and transition you into a Marvel Defender. By day, Matt Murdock is a blind lawyer, trying to fight for the little guy in court. At night, he hunts the dark streets and alleys of Hell’s KItchen. With his senses heightened, Murdock takes on mobsters and villains alike. With season 3 on the way, Daredevil will open up a new world of fantastic Marvel characters for you.daredevil-netflix-190285.jpg
  4. The Office- Based off of the originally British television show, The Office is a documentary style show following the co-workers of Dunder-Mifflin and how they run their business as well as the shenanigans they get up to. With 9 season now added to the platform, it’s perfect to binge watch when your trying to study. MDot-TheOffice-640x360-MP.jpg
  5. Friends- Rich with 90s pop culture, this sitcom follows 6 friends living in New York City and the crazy twists and turns of their lives. With plenty of relatable characters and great stories, you’ll be laughing on the sofa with a cup of coffee.0091876_0.jpg