Category: Opinion

How Captain Marvel won me over (the second time around)

Caution: spoilers below!

Buckle up boys, the girls are taking over! That’s right: on International Women’s Day, Marvel released the one, the only Captain Marvel. This will not be a review, but rather a reflection on what I took from the film and how it affected me personally. That being said, for all you who haven’t somehow seen it, buckle up and go see it now! For those who have already seen it, go see it again!

What I have discovered from my own viewing experience is that Captain Marvel is a movie that you need to rewatch to truly appreciate. When I first saw it in theaters, I sat there, not quit able to determine how I felt about Vers, aka Captain Marvel. The movie was set up as a prequel, so the audience, if they were up to date on the Marvel franchise, already recognized certain details and elements that in a lot of ways took the suspense out of the plot. The design of the movie was meant to highlight how Vers got her powers. We see her struggling to control her emotions as the Kree, the primary race of the planet Hala, keep reminding her that she needs to keep her emotions in check if she wants to see any action.

Due to the subdued nature of Vers’s character, I was left feeling unsatisfied in my first watch. Usually after watching Marvel films, I sit down with my own personal Marvel expert, being my father, who has raised me on these films. When we both saw it for the first time, we both were unsure about Vers and how she developed throughout the narrative. There seem to be something lacking about her, but after round two of viewing, I was really able find the depth in her story. I was able to, finally, really enjoy her character.

On watch two, I started picking up the beautiful nuances of Vers’s, or Captain Marvel’s, characterization. Vers had this sort of carefree attitude about her, even in the heat of battle– cracking a smile or making a witty remark. She would walk into a situation with confidence, knowing she was a power house, but she didn’t use her title or power to get her way.

She was a leader, like Captain America. And that, in itself, is where I think people get turned off by the character. People have this expectation that she will be a carbon copy of Steve Rogers: the man, the myth, the supersoldier.

The primary difference that I’ve identified is that Steve Rogers wanted to become a hero. He got dirty and fought side by side with his fellow soldiers in World War II. When superior officers tried to hold him back, he ignored them and stormed into battle to save his best friend. My dad kept pointing out that Vers wasn’t like Steve in this regard. She listened to the people who held her back and didn’t rebel like Captain America.

What I was quick to tell my father is that Vers was conditioned to hold back. In order to see the action she wanted, she was forced to listen to the Kree. There was no bending or breaking the rules. They had manipulated her into thinking that her powers where a gift from the Kree and that they could be taken away, so she remained obedient. Even Vers’s mentor and only friend told her to remain under the thumb of her superiors.

So let me ask you, What would you do if, in order to be like everyone else, you had to hold yourself back?

I asked my dad this question and he said he wasn’t sure, and that’s ok. I’m not 100 percent sure myself. But if I was being honest, I suspect that I would hold myself back just like her, because she truly believed in the Kree and in what they were doing.

The thing is, all Vers ever wanted was to help others. Despite having little knowledge of her past, she followed orders to a T, hoping that she could make some kind of positive change in the universe. Once she learned of the Kree’s true evil nature, she didn’t hesitate in switching sides– in turning around and fighting back against those who stole her life and manipulated her memories. It didn’t matter that they had ben her only friends, her only family, for years on end. She fought for what was right.

Vers was no more. Captain Carol Danvers, aka Captain Marvel, had arrived.

As I was watching the film for the second time, I found myself crying at a number of scenes that had originally left me with dry eyes. Whenever bits of Carol’s past were shown on-screen, my eyes would water. She was always shown being told to slow down– as a child and in the Air Force. The men that surrounded her doubted her ability even after she had, for all intents and purposes, proven herself. One guy in the film was even bold enough to ask her, “You know why they call it a cockpit, right?” But those comments didn’t stop her from getting back up, from pushing past the challenges in her life.

It was the scene where the Supreme Intelligence tells her she is only human, however, that really struck me. Because Carol Danvers, Captain Marvel, is human. But the thing is, she was a hero way before she could  shoot photon blasts from her fists. Even when pushed to the ground again and again, she got back up again and brushed the dirt from her knees.

“I’ve been fighting with one arm tied behind my back, but what happens when I’m finally set free?”

That was the moment she became not just a hero, but a superhero. The realization that she wasn’t Kree, but rather human, was just another moment of falling and standing up once more. She allowed herself to be wild, to be messy, to be emotional and outrageous, and that’s what ended up winning the battle for the good guys.

Carol Danvers is not Steve Rogers. They are two different types of heroes, and two different types of people. Yet they are both human, and they both made difficult choices. They wanted to serve for the greater good, but they both got a bit lost along the way.

Captian America is one of my favorite heroes because I got to watch a boy become a man and a man become a soldier for his country. He was the leader the Avengers needed before Infinity War– someone who was willing to stand with his friends and sacrifice himself for the world, but now, the Avengers need Captain Marvel. They failed in Infinity War. They lost– they fell down. It’s Captain Marvel’s job to help them stand up again.

By Maggie Christianson

How to build a profession: a personal look into Clarke’s Internship for Credit program

Becky Herrig, one of the heads of Clarke University’s Career Service Center, has been helping students pursue professional opportunities since 2011. Whether she be reviewing résumés, establishing contact with potential employers, or helping students build confidence as interviewees, Herrig is dedicated to the task of connecting students with internship experiences that will help prepare them for the working world.

Clarke University itself has heavily incorporated experiential opportunities into their curriculum over the past decade or so. Most majors offered at Clarke now require some type of internship experience as part of their programs. For students involved in those majors, it is common for them to register the actual credits under their general academic schedule, therefore making the work experience part of their class routine.

According to the Clarke website, “Credit for an Internship for Credit employment experience is based on the job description and the number of hours a student works.” Students are required to work 60 hours within a semester to acquire 1 credit hour on their transcript. Those registering an Internship for Credit are “billed the semester rate,” though if they happen to already be taking the maximum 18 credit hours within a semester, they will be billed for each internship credit hour above that limit. Additionally, they will be charged summer tuition to take an Internship for Credit during the break months.

Due to this intrinsic tie between internship experience and academia at Clarke, many students opt to take up internship positions on campus. The Marketing department at Clarke has been known to host interns, as has the Margaret Mann Academic Resource, though these are only a few examples of the many work opportunities on Clarke’s grounds. Additionally, according to Herrig, all work study positions on Clarke’s campus have the potential to be both paid and valid for credit.

That is, of course, if the position meets the proper criteria. When I had the opportunity to speak with Becky Herrig regarding Clarke and its encouragement of work experience, it was made clear that, regardless of location, an internship must provide real and valuable work experience in order for it to be considered for credit.

“We’re not just turning any job into an internship,” said Herrig. “There needs to be outcome based objectives in the student’s field attached to the position. It has to be a well-rounded learning process and experience.”

Throughout our discussion, Herrig was adamant about this component of the internship process. “We’re preparing students for the working world,” she stated. “Having experience is a big deal. Sometimes students say, ‘Becky, I did this internship and I just realized that I don’t want to pursue that,’ and I say, ‘That’s fine!’ It’s better that students get to know what they want to do now instead of later.”

And that’s the kicker with some internships. While many can be fruitful experiences that lead to realizations about professional goals and motivations, others can simply be a fulfillment of credit. Some internship opportunities might lead to future employment or a fulfilling career, while others might seem like a waste of a summer or semester. Herrig sees benefits either way.

“I tell students all the time to get off campus and get out of their comfort zone. It’s one thing to sit in a classroom, but it’s another to become a part of a business or a company with transferable skills.”

Max Kyte, a senior at Clarke University who is majoring in Communication, shares this perspective. “I think an internship is definitely useful for making contacts and getting a necessary insight into the area of work you’re interested in,” said Kyte during our brief discussion on internships and their place in the curriculum. “They can help show whether what you’re doing is something you actually want to be doing.”

Kyte completed an internship with Novelty Iron Works last semester and continues to work with them through this academic period. “My position there has given me lots of good insight into promotions, marketing, and analyzing audience reach and response. They really worked with my schedule to find the best time for both of us, which was definitely useful for me.”

Ashley Smith, also a senior Communication student, had a similar experience in her time at an unnamed print production company. “I worked as a graphic artist there, making t-shirts, designs, and a lot of other stuff. I definitely think the experience was beneficial, especially because I hope that they’ll hire me after my position ends.”

That’s what much of the encouragement towards internships is about, after all. Potential employment. According to Herrig, “A lot of times, one internship will turn into another, which will turn into an employment placement. Even if you don’t get employment in the institution you originally hire in, they can refer you somewhere else!”

However, what happens when you’re employed and feel confident enough in your abilities that the idea of an internship seems more unnecessary than beneficial? Dylan Marquez, a senior at Clarke University who is currently completing his CIS degree, stated that, while his major encouraged experiential opportunities, he feels prepared enough without that extra step.

“As far as job hunting and preparation go—in my capstone, we’ve been working on résumés and putting ourselves out there for jobs to find us. There’s been courses where we’ve worked on our LinkedIn pages and we’ve learned a pretty equal amount about technical and personal skills,” said Marquez in a brief interview.

Marquez’s Computer Information Systems major does not require an internship within its curriculum, though it is highly recommended by professors. Speaking to that, Marquez stated, “I like that they only suggest taking an internship and that it isn’t required. I felt prepared through my classes, and while I feel like taking an internship could help, I feel like I’ve been given the necessary skills to succeed as I am now. If an internship was required, I feel like that would be a huge additional stressor on my already heavy workload.”

What it all seems to boil down to is the idea of balance. In interviewing a number of students and the head of the Clarke Career Center, it’s become clear that Clarke’s view of work experience is revered and, at times, beneficial. However, the constant push and pull of academia versus experiential opportunities can be tiring.

I myself have completed a number of internships, from paid to unpaid, “for credit” and “not for credit.” Each has been valuable in some way, even the ones where I did nothing but copy and paste for eight hours a day, five days a week. These opportunities have provided me with some fantastic professional relationships that will, hopefully, aid in my job search post-graduation. In that same vein, I’ve also gotten the chance to better investigate what exactly I want to do for a living.

However, it was all under the veil of necessity. I’ll admit, there is definitely a benefit to having internships be required for course credit in certain majors. There’s a popular belief that students won’t do or complete anything unless there’s a grade attached to it, and while I don’t think that idea is 100% true, I do believe that the requirement of work experience adds an extra layer of motivation. That being said, there is the problem of internships becoming nothing more than an extra stressor for some students.

I myself am completing a major in Communication with a minor in Writing. Altogether, my programs require me to complete 6 internship credits. Taking into account Clarke’s hour/credit ratio, that means I’ll have to accomplish 360 hours of internship work in my time at Clarke. This, of course, is in addition to the 16 to 18 credit hours I’ll be taking each semester.

What I’m trying to get across is that there’s a line to be drawn when it comes to completing work experience while in an academic environment. Part of the appeal of university is that being a student becomes your fulltime job. So what happens when you take on a fulltime job…and then get another job? Some students are already working as a means of paying for their education, and the jobs they’re working aren’t necessarily ones that can be counted for internship credit. Where does this leave them in the grand scheme of things?

While there’s absolutely no harm in encouraging experiential opportunities, there can be harm caused when students become overwhelmed with the combination of work and academics. I can recall too many nights where I’ve put off homework to an unreasonable hour, trying to complete a spreadsheet for a supervisor of mine.

There should, I feel, be an iota of flexibility when it comes to Internship for Credit requirements. All in all, it should be a conversation between the students and the wonderful support system at the Career Center, along with the advisor and head of the program. Each student’s schedule (and life) is different, and a million things are viable to impact an individual’s ability to complete not only a degree, but an internship.

As it is now, students should look to the likes of Becky Herrig and their professors to learn more about what kinds of opportunities they can pursue to build their own professional repertoire. There are plenty of benefits in work experience, and there are tons of resources at Clarke University that can help in the process of finding and securing a professional position.

You can contact Becky Herrig at her Clarke email (becky.herrig@clarke.edu) to set up an appointment to discuss your options based on  your program of study. For more resources, you can also explore Clarke’s Career & Internships page.

Regardless of whether your major requires internship credits, it’s a good idea to look into your options. Whether you want to take on a remote internship that only requires you to work two hours a week, or whether you want to throw yourself into a full-time position career style, what you’re ultimately working towards is building your own professionalism. Analyze what works best for you, and what you think you can handle. Talk to your advisors and your peers, and keep moving forward. After all, “success is no accident.”

 

 

by Mimi Ottavi, Co-Editor-in-Chief of the Clarke Crux 

Dirty Computer: The biggest snub of the 2019 Grammys

From the get go, I will admit that I am biased. I have been a fan of Janelle Monáe since she released the song “Tightrope” in 2010. From the moment I saw her dancing across an asylum in a tuxedo, I was in love.  Through the releases of her more eclectic ArchAndroid and ElectricLady albums, I retained a deep seated respect for her and her work.

Screen Shot 2019-02-11 at 9.20.41 PM

via Rolling Stone

The 2018 release of her fifth studio album, Dirty Computer, only strengthened my love and respect for Ms. Monáe. A fusion of Afro-funk, rap, ‘90’s R&B, bubblegum pop and Prince-esque guitar riffs, Dirty Computer is a futuristic celebration of diversity. Paired with a gorgeous 48 minute visual or, as Monáe calls it, “Emotion Picture,Dirty Computer is a concept album which follows the life and rebirth of Jane 57821. Featuring hits like “Pynk”, “Make Me Feel,” and “Django Jane,” it was no surprise that Monáe earned Grammy nominations for Album of the Year and Best Music Video.

It was a surprise that she lost.

I hold nothing against Kacey Musgraves, the winner of this year’s award. However, I do have to question the criteria the Recording Academy are using to decide their winners. Are they looking for originality? Musicality? Creative lyricism? Because Janelle Monáe, in my book, checks every one of those boxes.

If you give Dirty Computer a listen yourself, which I highly recommend, you’ll see exactly why I’m so outraged. Not only is the album full of empowering hits that cross nearly every genre line— each and every song is filled with unmistakable heart. As a queer woman myself, songs like “Don’t Judge Me” and “Screwed” sound like anthems. The lyrics range from heartbreaking to funny, flirty, and outrageously relatable.

Past the wit, though, there is an underlying tone of seriousness and sincerity. In Monáe’s Emotion Picture, the character Zen (played by Tessa Thompson) admits at a pivotal part in the story that “People used to work so hard to be free. But we’re lucky here. All we have to do is forget.”

This single quote holds boatloads of cultural significance, especially in our current political climate when topics such as freedom and expression are highly debated.

At the end of the day, I believe that the Recording Academy avoided granting Dirty Computer Album of the Year for one reason and one reason alone: fear. The album itself is practically a love letter to progress, individuality, and independence. If I were to compare this years snub to a another famous Grammy brush-off, I’d say it was similar to the 2016 Adele vs Beyoncé debacle. People were outraged when Queen-Bey didn’t win Album of the Year for Lemonade, a stunning audio-visual masterpiece that celebrated and illustrated her experiences as a black woman in a strained relationship. Even Adele herself dedicated her acceptance speech to Beyoncé.

Not every detail fits, but the parallel is clear.

Regardless of the Recording Academy’s decision, I know in my heart that I will never find a more well-thought out, creative, and joyful album than Dirty Computer. It’s not only a collection of songs, it’s an experience— one filled with joy, hope, and above all, love. In years to come, I hope to see Janelle Monáe get the kind of recognition she deserves. After all, she’s Jane Bond, never Jane Doe.

 

 

by Mimi Ottavi

All I want for Christmas is to pass my exams

Ah, finals week. It’s much liked the countdown to Christmas, but instead of Holiday cheer, students are riddled with sleep-deprivation, over-caffeination, and stress. It’s the magical week where majors of all kinds collectively lose their heads over exams, projects, and papers.

Everyone goes into finals week with a different attitude. Some students may suffer from test anxiety, while others may feel their heartrates pickup at the thought of giving a speech. There are perfectionists and those that go with the flow– optimists, pessimists, and everything in between.

Regardless of what kind of student you may be, whether you strategize your time with amazing restraint—determined to get your work done, even if it means staying up all night every once and awhile—or whether you can’t find it in yourself to stay up past 10 p.m. anymore, it’s important to acknowledge the one variable that unites us all during these trying last few weeks of the semester.

We all care far too much.

We treat our grades and our GPA’s as the end all be all—and, for some of us, they are. These grades are the gateway to our degrees which we need in order to go out into the work force or into a higher degree of study. So, we chug our cups of coffee and energy drinks, we sacrifice our mental health to our textbooks and notes, we go to bed at 3:00 a.m., and we panic all the while about whether or not we’re prepared enough.

The unfortunate truth is that most of us aren’t.

But we can be. Believe it or not, studying works wonders. If you find studying difficult, don’t be afraid to reach out for help. There are a number of different resources available for free use on campus, such as the MARC, the professors, and even other students. It may sound crazy, but everyone wants you to pass just as much as you do.

At the end of finals, when you turn in that last exam, when you give your final presentation, you’re free for the rest of 2018. Sure, you won’t know your grade for some time, but as long as you put in the work and give it your all, it doesn’t matter. You did all you could.

So enjoy your break and scrape together whatever holiday cheer you have left, because you deserve to relax. You worked hard this semester. You deserve this break, because if you’re coming back next semester? Who knows when you’ll get another chance to sleep for an entire month.

Happy Holidays, and Merry Finals!

 

By Maggie Christianson

Already missing Halloween? Here’s a list of our favorite horror movies that will help keep the spooky spirit alive!

Though we’ve just left the Halloween season in the dust, that doesn’t mean we have to give up any and all things spooky and scary! Horror, to me, is one of the most interesting film genres, though it doesn’t get near as much love as films that fit into boxes like romance and comedy. Many may think horror movies are corny, dumb, or just downright disturbing– and sometimes, they are! But despite these preconceptions, it’s still possible to find enjoyment in a scary movie every now and then. Below, I’ve compiled a list of my all-time favorite horror movies. Some are merely slivers of a larger series of films—others are standalones. That’s not to say the series as a whole isn’t good, but these films in particular are the best of their counterparts! Beware of spoilers in the descriptions of each movie!

  1. Paranormal Activity (2007)
  • I have to say that I’ve never found these movies to be truly scary. They’ve startled me a couple of times, but I’ve never been clinging to my seat with my heart in my throat. I remember watching this film for the first time. The concept of telling a story through security cameras was groundbreaking, and to this day, I can’t think of another movie that accomplishes this style as well as Paranormal Activity did. It’s a great movie to watch curled up with friends in the winter weather!

 

  1. Scream (1996)
  • Scream has become the pinnacle of 90’s horror– calling out dumb tropes, being self-aware of its own ridiculousness, and giving the horror genre a number of iconic scenes, Scream is commonly known as one of the most widely known slasher flick of all time.

 

  1. The Nightmare Before Christmas (1993)
  • While The Nightmare Before Christmas isn’t at all a traditional horror feature, it surely has a number of scary or spooky moments that could leave anyone with chills. Done in the style of claymation, the chilling setting and movement of the characters sets a tone that is sure to put a shiver down your spine. And, with Christmas fast approaching, it’s a perfectly appropriate film to watch by a fire with a cup of cocoa in hand!

 

  1. The Purge: Anarchy (2014)
  • The Purge franchise tends to get a lot of flack—many say the kills are over the top, and the plots aren’t well crafted, but I want to give the series some credit. When the Purge came out, I was pretty dissatisfied. There were some good moments, but overall, I thought the movie wasn’t anything spectacular. However, when Purge: Anarchy came out, I was astounded how different the sequel felt to the original. To go from a fight in the house of a rich person to people defending themselves on the street gives the audience a neat view on how the premise of the Purge works. The Purge: Anarchy was the first movie I have seen which changes the entire premise of the series halfway through.

 

  1. The Thing (1981)
  • This movie, while it isn’t at the top of the list, is one of my all-time favorites! The Thing is a film which is unafraid to develop layers in both character and plot. The concept of aliens is always a fun one to explore, and The Thing does so with vigor. There is so much we don’t know about space, and The Thing takes full advantage of that lack of knowledge. This movie tests the trust of everyone, relying on the build of paranoia in audiences rather than jump scares or gore. The entire premise of this movie is that an alien can transform into any living thing, so no one knows if a person is who they say. Setting up that suspense and never settling down makes this a great horror movie.

 

  1. Night of the Living Dead (1968)
  • This movie is a jewel in the sand of horror movies. Night of the Living Dead was one of the first movies to establish the zombie theme in horror, and I think it’s the only one that has done it right since its original release. The film itself has a controversial history behind it, being that it was one of the first movies of to have a black lead protagonist. (Spoilers ahead!) This black lead also had one of the most controversial deaths in cinema, being shot at the end of the movie for seemingly no reason. Did the shooter believe Ben, the black character played by actor Duane Jones, think he was a zombie, or did he have quiet racist intentions? This question is never answered, which leads watchers to delve into some introspection after the credits start rolling.

 

  1. Halloween (1978)
  • Being one of the titans of the horror genre, Halloween, similarly to Paranormal Activity, is considered a classic! This film was the first to establish the monster that is Michael Myers, making this antagonist a household names to both those who love and hate horror. I give major credit to John Carpenter for his tremendous work during this movie and the others of the series, as well as Jamie Lee Curtis for giving us in the audience such a chilling performance.

 

  1. Halloween 3: Season of the Witch (1982)
  • So, I’m breaking the one rule I set up for myself, which is to not include more than one film from a single series, but for good reason! This movie has never felt like a true sequel to Halloween, in my opinion. What gives this movie an edge over the original Halloween is that the plot of this movie is gruesome, much more gruesome than the first two of the series. To sum up the plot, a man sells a few masks to some local children and on Halloween night, he attempts to use a stone from Stonehenge for a Celtic ritual which will melt the heads off all the kids wearing the masks. While to some the concept may sound ridiculous, to a kid who still finds joy in dressing up on Halloween, this is terrifying. I’ve been afraid of wearing masks for years, and watching this movie again still terrifies me. A great flick to watch if you’re already missing the Halloween season!

 

  1. A Nightmare on Elm Street 3: Dream Warriors (1987)
  • It’s hard to describe to people why I love this movie, but I’m going to try. I think what puts this movie over the other Nightmare on Elm Streets is that this movie lets Freddy have fun, or as much fun a psychotic supernatural killer can have. I think a lot of his most memorable kills from the franchise come from this movie. You have a girl being electrocuted through a television, another being injected with poison filled syringes, and a kid being thrown off a building after being strung up like a puppet by his tendons. It sets itself apart from the others by playing loose with the rules of reality for Freddy, and I think that makes the film all the more entertaining. Freddy doesn’t have to make sense because in the world of Elm Street, it’s Freddy that makes the rules.

 

  1. Friday the 13th Part 4: The Final Chapter
  • The Friday the 13th films were the first I ever watched as a kid. I remember being terrified yet amazed by the killer that is Jason Vorhees. He goes from being a killer living in Crystal Lake to an immortal being to killing in Manhattan to being sent off to space. This man/supernatural monster/psycho killer has seen it all! Now, while I do love the entire franchise, part 4 takes the place of my number one pick because of one character alone. Tommy Jarvis. (Spoilers ahead!) In the beginning of The Final Chapter, Tommy starts as an innocent nerd, but after witnessing all of the evil committed by Jason, he snaps and kills Jason himself. Yes, he kills Jason! The twist of having a seemingly defenseless nerd murder the famous antagonist is brilliant and shocking.

 

Was one of your favorite horror flicks not included on this list? Let us know! We at the Crux would love to hear your opinions on what you like to watch when you find yourself missing the Halloween season.

By Dane Shaull

Raising Student Involvement

Student involvement at Clarke has been at a significant low for a couple of years. The students on Clarke’s campus are rising in number, but that doesn’t mean that student involvement is gaining any traction. By boosting student involvement, it’s possible that students would be more willing to consider the campus home.

Sydney Eustice, president of the Clarke Student Association, says that “One of the goals of the CSA is to help student organizations get more students to attend events.” She believes that, as a campus, “We need to get rid of the stigma that student athletes don’t have time to join in the student organizations events or other sporting events. “ Sydney also mentioned that the Clarke Student Association has meetings every other Sunday hold discussions regarding campus life and the steps CSA can take to help improve it. She says that all students are welcome to join these meetings to present new ideas.

Roane Hand, primary contact of the Spanish club, agrees, stating that “Giving students somewhere to go makes them want to come, which can up the stakes of encouraging them to join.”  Roane elaborated on how she, as a club leader, gets word out about student organizations like the Spanish club. “The only real way to get more students involved is word-of-mouth or face-to-face. It’s a lot harder to tell someone no to their face. If they do say yes and then they don’t show up, you know their face, so when you see them in the hall it can create an awkward situation.”

A resident assistant, Lexi Wenz, had plenty to say not only on student involvement, but the overall environment of Clarke University. Wenz said of the school that “Last year, it felt like this school was a suitcase school. Students lived here during the week, but then left on the weekends. I guess that in my first two years, the Clarke Activity Board had events every weekend or they were more planned out. The chalkboard in the tunnel between Mary Ben and Mary Jo always had weekly events.” As a resident assistant, Lexi gets a different opportunity to get students involved. Lexi says she normally tries to update her residents by letting them know when and where events are happening on campus or in the city.

 

Every week, campus engagement also sends out an email covering the weekly events taking place on and off campus. Most students find this to be helpful, allowing them to plan their schedules accordingly with the addition of events they’d like to attend. In regards to how else to get the word out about campus events, students have been pushing to better utilize the chalkboard in the tunnel between Mary Ben and Mary Jo.

While the university doesn’t make the student, the students definitely make the university. Clarke for a few years now has had a significantly low rate of student involvement, which has impacted the overall environment of Clarke University. Hopefully, over the next couple of months, students will become more aware of what opportunities Clarke has to offer, both on and off campus.

 

Morgan Foster

Mental Illness in College

We all know that college is a time of new experiences. College is really a test, it gives us a taste of the real world and at some points slaps us with reality. While going through college we learn a lot about ourselves that we didn’t know before, and one of those things is how well we can handle the stress of the real world. With the constant studying, assignments and impending due dates, college students commonly become overwhelmed and cannot handle the pressure of higher education. This can leads to mental health issues.  Mental health is defined as “Emotional, psychological, and social well-being. It affects how we think, feel, and act. It also helps determine how we handle stress, relate to others, and make choices,” (1). Throughout college students will commonly test the limits of their mental health and will potentially end up pushing themselves to the point of developing a mental illness. It is important for students to understand the importance of taking care of their mental health and to know how to when it is time to seek help when they need it.

The most common mental health issues found in college students are suicide and depression, stress and anxiety, addiction, eating disorders, bipolar disorder, ADHD,  and sleep disorders (2). There are many signs that can help determine mental health conditions before they worsen; unusual sleeping habits, low energy and ambition, change in hygiene habits, thoughts of harming yourself or others,  as well as feelings of worthlessness, helpless or hopeless feelings, and changes in appetite. When these signs are experienced its best to reach out to a counselor or advisor to seek help before it gets too out of hand.

An anonymous professor at Clarke University explained that he thought the most strenuous part about being in college that affects mental health is students being on their own. He explained that parents are not teaching kids to function on their own before they are thrown into the complexity of college. He explained that as a parent it is their responsibility early on to teach children the basics of independence. When asked for advice on how to help students deal with the struggles of sustaining mental health he recommended analyzing your week. Most college students when mapping out their week have too much leisure time, do not spend enough time studying or doing homework. For example, if you have four hours of free time, spend two hours studying then play video games. He also said that students feed themselves negative thoughts, in which he provided a hand out which allows for an individual to assess or challenge the negative thoughts in order to prevent them from altering one’s mental health. One would believe that the drop out rate would be high considering the stress that college can put on one with mental health issues, and this professor agrees. He stated that between three and four years ago about 5-10 psychology majors dropped out at Clarke during the spring semester because of depression and anxiety disorders. As a college educator, he has seen students experience mental health issues first hand. In his experience he said the most common signs of mental health issues that he has seen consist of continuous absences from class, late work, previously stellar work to more poor-quality work and the physical appearance of the student is different, students have baggy eyes, poor complexion, look sloppy in overall appearance and lack overall hygiene.

Liz Schuler, a Clarke instructor believes that mental illness is seen as a stigma but has also seen the powerful affects of mental illness. She says that so far from her knowledge about 3 students have already dropped out this semester. What some may find surprising is that Clarke staff do not have to go through training to be informed about mental illness or how to help the students who are struggling.

Mental illness is a neglected topic that most individuals are unknowledgeable about. To those who deal with a mental illness, do not be afraid to reach out, college is a mess sometimes. You shouldn’t have to be. Your mental health is not a stigma, and you are not your mental illness.

By Alexis Decker`

2)“College Student Mental Health.” Psychology, www.learnpsychology.org/mental-health/.

1)“What Is Mental Health?” What Is Mental Health? | MentalHealth.gov,www.mentalhealth.gov/basics/what-is-mental-health.

College lacrosse continues to spread rapidly in non-traditional lacrosse areas

College lacrosse is growing rapidly in the state of Iowa. While this is all fine and dandy, Iowa to this day has no varsity high school lacrosse teams. As lacrosse rises in popularity as a spectator sport, more and more colleges in areas lacking high school programs have begun to add collegiate varsity programs. This is both a brilliant athletic and academic recruiting strategy, which is almost guaranteed to increase out of state enrollment.

Not only has lacrosse become popular in the United States, but across the globe as well. Most teams are compiled of players from Canada and the United States, but it’s become common for players from Europe to appear on NCAA and NAIA rosters. Here at Clarke, the lacrosse team is made up of players from all over the United States and Canada. Freshman Canadian attack Drew Bannister had some comments to share on the topic of lacrosse and it’s rise in popularity.

“Lacrosse really is on a rise in the US and across the world, which means more players like me will be coming to the U.S. for school and lacrosse”, says Bannister. These sorts of opportunities mean more and more kids from across the world are starting to pick up a lacrosse stick in order to try out this amazing sport. For many, the draw of lacrosse comes from the finesse and aggression found within the sport that’s similar to hockey or soccer. It’s fast, skillful, brutal, and downright fascinating to watch.

Clarke University has recently taken on a new lacrosse coach. Coach Morhac, who heads both the Men’s and Women’s programs, is currently starting his second season with the University. Last year he led both teams to school records for most wins in a season. Morhac, along with Louis Deeny, a student assistant, was happy to give some insight as to why so many programs are popping up around the Midwest.

“The answer is primarily enrollment, with the exception of some schools with excess funding”, says Deeny. This essentially means schools will continue to add programs for financial gain.

Morhac agreed, adding “Schools like Saint Ambrose University had club teams then made the choice to add varsity programs due to the boom in high school lacrosse.”

If schools are willing to dip their feet into the water on new sports and take a risk, they clearly have to believe in the growth of the sport. This faith in lacrosse and it’s inevitable popularity extends to women’s teams as well.

“On the women’s side, lacrosse is introduced as a low budget and high enrollment option to balance out Title IX,” says Morhac. Essentially, this means that schools are introducing the women’s game as a way to comply and balance out scholarships with Title IX, a civil rights law which ensures fair financial treatment between men’s and women’s sports.

The lacrosse world by no ways is in ideal condition, but with more growth worldwide and in the college game on both the men’s and women’s side it will soon reach the level lacrosse fans have wanted it to be.

 

By Tucker LaBelle

 

Top 5 Shows On Netflix You Can Binge Right Now

Too much homework? Need a mental break from all those studies? Well, then take the time to binge a new TV series on Netflix! Regardless of whether you’re mooching off your parents account or if you’ve got your own, here’s a list of the 5 best shows to binge on Netflix when you’re not in the mood to cram.

  1. Grey’s Anatomy- Love drama? How about hot doctors? Well then you have come to the right place. The show follows Meredith Grey, who is starting off as an intern at a hospital in Seattle. Not only do we watch her struggle with maintaining relationships with her colleagues and trying to keep a lid on some family drama, she finds herself in a forbidden romance as well. With 14 seasons posted on Netflix, with number 15 on the way, this show will have you drooling for more.greys-anatomy-memes-long-live-grey-s-5b1ed102fa6bcc0036c4d53b.jpg
  2. Stranger Things- Full of sci-fi and 80s culture, this thriller follows Joyce as she investigates the disappearance of Will, her 12 year old son. As they investigate Will’s disappearance, they come to unravel a series of conspiracies, exposing the details of government experiments and the collusion of supernatural forces.  With Stranger Things seasons 1 and 2 both on Netflix, it will keep you hanging on the edge of your seats. There are, of course, jumpscares. You’ve been warned.1464696-strangerthings-1500797978-936-640x480.jpg
  3. Daredevil- Are you a Marvel fan but you can’t wait for the next Marvel movie? Daredevil is the perfect watch for breaks between films. It will also get you hooked and transition you into a Marvel Defender. By day, Matt Murdock is a blind lawyer, trying to fight for the little guy in court. At night, he hunts the dark streets and alleys of Hell’s KItchen. With his senses heightened, Murdock takes on mobsters and villains alike. With season 3 on the way, Daredevil will open up a new world of fantastic Marvel characters for you.daredevil-netflix-190285.jpg
  4. The Office- Based off of the originally British television show, The Office is a documentary style show following the co-workers of Dunder-Mifflin and how they run their business as well as the shenanigans they get up to. With 9 season now added to the platform, it’s perfect to binge watch when your trying to study. MDot-TheOffice-640x360-MP.jpg
  5. Friends- Rich with 90s pop culture, this sitcom follows 6 friends living in New York City and the crazy twists and turns of their lives. With plenty of relatable characters and great stories, you’ll be laughing on the sofa with a cup of coffee.0091876_0.jpg

Feelings of Neglect Among Pride

Is Clarke University considering anything and everything for its athletics? Some students on campus, specifically student athletes, feel as though their respective sports are being overlooked by administration, thus, making them feel unimportant.

Decorated teams like Baseball, Softball, and Track and Field all been competing off campus since each of their inaugural seasons. Baseball competes at A.J. Spiegel Park in Peosta which is about a 20-minute drive. Softball competes at Veteran’s Memorial Park which is a 7-minute drive, and Track and Field have never even had home field advantage as they are always on the road. These teams, along with two Lacrosse teams, two Golf teams, two soccer teams, and potentially our new football team will have to share one indoor facility throughout the year, the Gantz Center, which is also a 7-minute drive from campus. Clarke does not provide transportation to these off-campus facilities.

Baseball, Softball, and Track and Field have been exceptionally successful in the past few years; however, a number of student-athletes feel as though they have nothing to show for it.

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Photo Credit: College Consensus 

Campus is changing, and some concerns are coming to light. There is little word from the administration regarding what exactly these new facilities are going to look like. Students can visibly see the plethora of space there is on campus, and that there is a lot of room for possible facilities for sports that seem to have been forgotten.

In a conversation with All-American baseball player, Michael Lopez, a junior from Rancho Cucamonga, California, he expresses his discontent with the current facilities stating, “I feel like our team is consistently successful, however we still get the short end of the stick having to drive 20 minutes to practice every day. A lot of us are from far away states and don’t have cars at our disposal.”

Lopez continues with expressing frustration stating, “It just sucks because student-athletes work as hard as we can to represent Clarke and what has Clarke done for us? Now that they are taking trees down, I can see that there is definitely room on campus for a baseball field or even an Avila type facility which is a full length make-shift football field, soccer field, softball field, and baseball field…I know I am not alone by saying there is room for this type of facility at Clarke.”

Clarke softball players also express their frustration and feelings of neglect. Ally Renforth explains the softball field is less than conducive for competition and practice, “…we have to haul all of our equipment from Gantz to [Veteran’s Memorial Park] to the school. It’s a constant struggle having to chase down equipment.”

Renforth continues to express her frustrations with the actual field, “We play at a community field. Kids ride their bikes across it and even run onto our field during practice. We have to put up a fence in order for our field to be regulation, we have an extremely small dugout for our team, and we have a scoreboard with broken pegs for plastic numbers that fall off. In all of my four years of college softball we are the only team I’ve seen with less than satisfactory facilities like ours.”

Renforth continues to state, “don’t get me wrong, we are content with the facilities that we have, but now that Clarke is making new facilities for a team that doesn’t even exist yet, it kind of hurts feeling as though we have been totally forgotten about.”

In closing with Lopez he expressed, “Clarke is doing a lot of things right, but they are also doing a lot wrong. The university should be caring thoughtfully about their current students and student-athletes because we are the best chance they have at generating donors. Instead, most of us are unhappy and envy schools like Georgia Gwinnett, University of Dubuque and the facilities that many teams in our conference have. I understand sports aren’t everything in life, but Clarke is wasting the chance to bring a championship culture across all sports to campus.”

Personally being affected by this, it seems like Clarke is jumping the gun on some of the decisions they make. This article is not meant to be taken offensively. I think Coach Regalado is doing a great job recruiting a team and getting the Clarke community excited about football. Administration is doing a great job in supporting football on the Clarke campus. The soccer and lacrosse teams are all equally deserving of benefiting from these future facilities. All of these things aside, it still doesn’t hide the fact that current student-athletes feel neglected for a shiny new object when they have put in the blood, sweat, and tears in order to make their sports worthy of respect.

 

By: Jamie Deering