Tag: clarke university

Completing Compass: A survival guide for students who still don’t know what Compass is

Hello fellow Clarkies!

As the semester winds down to the last sprint of finals, many Clarke students have received emails about Compass. Awareness of Compass and its requirements are especially important as you begin to consider what classes you will be taking next semester, and perhaps the one after that. As a student myself, I am also trying to figure out the best, and the easiest, way to earn all these credits to graduate. I have gone through the Source, my program evaluation, talked with teachers, and talked with Kara down in Compass to find the most efficient way to earn these requirements. Whether you need to fulfill more extracurricular credits, take more classes, or do both (like me), this guide will hopefully help you plan out what exactly is your best course of action. If you have any questions regarding Compass and its requirements, please don’t be afraid to direct them to Kara Schroeder, the Compass Experience Coordinator!

First and foremost, it’s important to know that Compass is broken up into three separate sub-requirements: Integrative Inquiry, Global Awareness and Social Responsibility, and Professional Preparedness (which you don’t really need to worry about because it is usually awarded upon the completion of your major courses).

INTEGRATIVE INQUIRY

This category only requires you to fulfill one integrative inquiry course before you graduate. In your myInfo account where you search for classes, there is a specific classification for Integrative Inquiry. So, instead of searching for courses in the English category, you can search for courses that will count towards Integrative Inquiry.

Here are a couple of classes that you can take that fulfill this requirement for next year. However, always make sure that it is still being offered and that the time works for your schedule.

Classes:

Fall 2019:

(1218) Topics: Sport & History in the United States

(1361) Topics: Sport & History in the United States

(0313) Topics: Persuasion

(1392) Topics: Death and Dying

(0837) Christianity & American Culture

Spring 2020:

(1187) App, Ethics: Law, Justice, & Good

(1206) Science and Religion

(1207) Science and Religion

 

GLOBAL AWARENESS AND SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY (GASR)

This category is more complicated. In addition to completing a diversity credit, you also need to fulfill 30 hours of pre-approved activities.

30 hours of pre-approved activities can seem like something simple and easy you could achieve in a semester, but it can be a daunting task. While there are many opportunities in the Dubuque community, it can be difficult to find activities that count. For example, just last week, the Clarke Drag show counted for two hours of GASR. If you were starting at the full 30 hours, this will put a dent in it, leaving behind 28 hours. You can’t just attend the activities, however. You must also write up a reflection of the activity.

Reflection:

Write about 3 of the 5 competencies (a paragraph each)

(Not “It was weird because we are so different.” Think more critically)

Cultural Self-awareness:

Is aware of own cultural rules and biases and recognizes multiple perspectives

Knowledge of Cultural world frameworks:

Understands the complexity of elements important to members of another culture in relation to its relation to its history, values, politics, communication styles, economy, or beliefs and practices.

Openness to difference:

Is open to interactions with culturally different others, is aware of own judgements, and indicates a willingness to understand

Personal and social responsibility:

Recognizes the feelings of others and acts in a supportive manner that is that is driven by social and moral decisions

Engagement in concrete efforts to: develop solidarity, meet human needs, or further justice, peace, or the common good:

Participate in civic engagement opportunities

Activities:

It is important that you are interacting with people that are culturally different and have had different experiences. Also, a tip: if you do activities that take more time, or are long term volunteer work, you can write fewer reflections overall. Some of the activities that can fulfill these are:

Clarke Inclusive Games

Clarke Dance Marathon

Dubuque Rescue Mission

Presentation Lantern Center

Hills and Dales Volunteering

Area Residential Care

There is also a detailed list in an email sent out by Compass about opportunities for experience hours. If you’ve already deleted it, just reach out to Kara Schroeder.

Classes:

Here are a couple of classes that you can take which fulfill the requirements for next year. In planning your schedule, always make sure that the course is still being offered and that the time works for your schedule.

Fall 2019:

(0982) Community Health Care

(0984) Community Health Care Lab

(0985) Community Health Care Lab

(0986) Community Health Care Lab

(0338) Multicultural Faces of Jesus

(0620) Elementary Spanish I

(0621) Spanish Conversation, Composition and Grammar

(0781) Intro to Social Welfare & Social Work

Spring 2020:

(1002) Transcultural Health Care

(1003) Transcultural Health Care Lab

(1024) Community Health Care Lab

 

It is better to get these out of the way so that you’re not stressing about fulfilling them. Worst case scenario is that you run out of time and therefore activities available for you. Not completing these compass requirements results in you not being allowed to graduate, so juniors, take note! You have one year to get all of this done. If you do nothing over break, that is only 16 weekends each semester, 32 days per semester. College flies by quick.

If you have remaining questions regarding Compass and it’s requirements, just reach out to Kara Schroeder at kara.schroeder@clarke.edu!

 

by Charlotte Rodewald

To knit or knot to knit?

Life in Apartment 303 can be unexpected.

There are so many different temperaments between me and my five roommates, but we all share similar enough personalities. We are all social creatures, so the apartment is always full. Described by my roommate Lauryn, it’s like “living with a pack of wolves.”

Almost every night, our guy friends visit and do their homework in our living room. These are my favorite moments: coming home to Lauryn sitting in her chair by the, spewing random facts. The guys usually take up the kitchen table, forcing the rest of us to sit on the couch or floor while a show plays softly in the background. It is there that the knitting circle began.

It started back during first semester of sophomore year, when Lauryn had first made her announcement to the apartment about her new hobby. She use to knit back in the day, and had decided she wanted to take it up again. “Okay,” I told her. “Give it a go.”

And she did.

I remember her purchasing all this yarn, starting to roll it into balls, while the boys watched, enraptured. She patiently showed the guys how to properly wrap the yarn tightly. First it was Hayden who helped her, spooling her yarn as Lauryn started to knit. Eventually, Hayden asked to try. Soon after Hayden, Kevin was asking to join, and then several others who decided to take up the hobby.  

It wasn’t long before I found myself coming home to knitting parties in our living room. Our guy friends would sit with Lauryn, all quietly watching the TV as they quietly knitted scarves, headbands, or practiced on the shitty dish towel we had laying around the kitchen.

At first, I wasn’t quite sure what to make of all these guys knitting. I laughed at it at first, seeing these athletic men chilling together with their knitting needles, but I ultimately supported them. They enjoyed it, so what was the harm? As the semester continued, several of the guys moved on from their brief stint with knitting, but at least two of my guy friends continue this hobby. They’ve since bought their own needles, and it’s become routine for them to beg Lauryn and I to pick up rolls of yarn for them each time we make a trip to Joann Fabrics.

This behavior has shaped what I consider my new normal. It would feel odd to walk into a home without the boys sat in the living room, knitting away. Recently, Lauryn and I have joined them once again, picking up a new pastime: embroidery. So now, if a stranger was to walk into our apartment, they would be met with four individuals, knitting and embroidering away like a bunch of elder couples.

The moral of this story, if there is to be one, is to try something new. Regardless of whether it’s a hobby suited to other people’s perception of you, there’s no harm in testing out different hobbies. If you’re interested enough in knitting, give it a try! The world is your knitting circle. You just need to make the first stitch.

 

by Maggie Christianson

Alumni Adam O’Dell to present Mackin-Mailander Lecture

Adam-ODell-photo-640x0-c-default.jpg

via Clarke University

At 2:00 p.m. on Sunday, April 7th, Adam O’Dell will be conducting a lecture in the Jansen Music Hall at Clarke University. The lecture itself is a part of the Mackin-Mailander Alumni Lecture series, entitled “Writing Home, Wherever It May Be.”

The lecture itself surrounds O’Dell’s emotional journey through music and how his connection to Iowa has shifted and changed as he’s moved from place to place since his graduation in 2015.

“Pieces of music serve as snapshots of the composers’ lives; where they lived, who they knew, what they experienced, and how they responded to these influences,” O’Dell stated in a press release.  “For even the most vagabond composers, the concept of ‘home’ permeates the soul of their work, whether that home is found in people, places, or ideas.”

O’Dell has a number of talents, all of which he has explored in different branches of his career. Whether he be composing, teaching, or performing, O’Dell is fervent in his exploration of different styles, combining genres such as jazz, folk, theatre, and more to create story-like pieces that capture audience’s attention.

Some of the more prominent achievements of O’Dell’s include his international commissions and his work with the Dubuque Symphony Orchestra. More recent commissions include the Altered Sound Duo, the Oklahoma State University Symphony Orchestra, Ensemble 135, Just Duet, Third Inversion Reed Trio, hornist Andrew Pelletier, and the Julien Chamber Choir. O’Dell’s work has also reached international audiences, having been performed in the likes of the UK, the Czech Republic, Russia, and more.

The lecture itself is free to the public and to Clarke students.

Musical Menus is in in full swing

On April 4th and 5th at 6:30pm, Clarke students will be taking part in Musical Menus, a fundraiser that celebrates the work of the drama, music, and theatrical departments. Throughout the two nights, many students, as well as Clarke ensembles, will be performing a variety of songs coming from the jazz era.

Kylie Gougler, a visiting professor and head of the vocal performance program, described Musical Menu’s as a way to not only fundraise as a program, but to give back to the community.

“In general, Musical Menu’s is really just a way for us to showcase Clarke University’s musical department and the talent that we have on campus,” says Gougler.

“This year, I’ve decided to change the program a little bit because it’s Clarke’s 175th year, and my first year here, so I wanted to put a fresh little spin on it. In the past this performance has been a lot of solo performances, and I wanted to include a lot of group performances with an overarching theme. I was watching Urinetown last semester and then it came to me— 1920’s jazz.”

Influenced by Gershwin and Cole Porter, Gougler searched through a number of popular composer’s repertoires. Finding pieces for bands, choruses, and solo performers alike, students have begun rehearsing, running musical numbers and blocking their performances. The show itself has an overarching narrative theme, according to Gougler, and the set itself will follow the pace of dinner.

“Every single course in the meal has its own theme. The first is getting around New York City, the second is the trials and tribulations of Love, the third is an illustration of how great love can be, and the fourth is a hodgepodge of fun and witty songs that are reflective of the era.”

Despite being new at Clarke University, Gougler has invested plenty of effort into this fundraiser. “I’ve chosen all the music, I made all the cuts, I assigned all the singers their repertoire, I’m going to be doing some very minimal staging for the show, and I’m also spearheading a silent auction and working with marketing and advertising to get our show out to the community so we have as many patrons here as we can.”

To fill the seats at Musical Menus, and to experience a show the likes of which you haven’t seen before, pre-order tickets right now. If you are looking to come to this event, please email Dora Serna at Dora_Serna@clarke.edu.

 

 

by Dane Shaull

Preventing Sexual Violence through Education on Campus

Students at Clarke University, as well as students from all federally funded colleges and universities in the United States, are required to take sexual violence prevention training every year. To comply with the U.S. Department of Education requirements, Clarke provides a mandatory online training course to its students in the fall to be completed by October. The goal of this training, as well as other campus events, is to reduce instances of sexual violence and create a safe environment on campus for all students.

Sexual assault and sexual violence are not topics that college students she away from. Cases like Brock Turner and the Vanderbilt football players in 2015 caused an uproar of anger around the nation about sexual assault on campus and the justice system’s judgement on sexual assault cases. According to RAINN (Rape, Abuse & Incest National Network), 11.2% of all undergraduate and graduate students experience sexual assault during their four years at college1. Clarke is not immune to this problem, even though it is viewed as a small, friendly campus. The online training program, and events like dramatic dialogue during CONNECT weekend, are created to educate students on sexual assault statistics, its implications, and resources available to them on campus. Through preventative education, Clarke works to change the environment on campus so that all students feel safe no matter what.

Education plays a vital role in the prevention of sexual violence on campus. One of the CDC’s five strategies to prevent sexual assault is to teach the skills necessary to prevent sexual violence through different areas of student’s lives2. Learning about healthy relationships and sexuality is one part of the education. For example, students are taught the warning signs of abusive tendencies so they know what to look out for in any kind of intimate or romantic relationships.

Kate Zanger, Vice President for Student Life and Title IX Coordinator at Clarke University, discussed what Clarke is doing to educate its students to prevent sexual violence. “One of the reasons we added the on-line sexual violence education class is to demonstrate that we are reaching students. It is not the only education tool we use. The CONNECT Orientation program for undergraduate students contains information about defining consent, by-stander intervention and our policy and resources including where to make a report and where to access confidential resources.” When asked why an online program, Kate explained that it is the best way to reach the most number of students, and that they have a high response rate. In previous years, Clarke has also asked coaches to require their athletes to attend on-campus events featuring films like “Hunting Grounds” followed a discussion by on- and off-campus personnel. Since Clarke’s student body has many athletes, requiring them to attend an event such as this ensures education is reaching a large percentage of students.

People are increasingly becoming aware of the prevalence and implications of sexual assault on campus. Instructing students regarding their rights and the resources available to them on campus can help victims and eliminate rape culture on campus. On this topic, Kate Zanger reported “I think as a result of our education efforts, we have experienced an increase in faculty, staff and students bringing concerns to me as the Title IX Coordinator for Clarke. I make an outreach to be sure the person knows their options for reporting and resources.” Through education, students can help each other and themselves fight through an impossible situation.

 

[1] https://www.rainn.org/statistics/campus-sexual-violence
[2] https://www.cdc.gov/violenceprevention/sexualviolence/prevention.html

 

by Sydney Young

 

 

Clarke University announces new president, Dr. Thom D. Chesney

On February 26th, Sister Joanne Burrows announced Dr. Thom D. Chesney as the new president of Clarke University. Burrows, who has been the president of Clarke University since 2006, announced she was going to be retiring from her position in July of 2018. Her announcement sparked a nationwide search and concluded with a unanimous vote from the Board of Trustees, electing Chesney as the 16th president of the university.

Thom Chesney photo

via Clarke University

According to a biography issued by Clarke University, Dr. Thom Chesney previously held the position of president at Brookhaven College of Dallas, TX. He also maintained a number of administrative positions at other surrounding universities and colleges around Texas. Among these are The University of Texas (UT) at Dallas, vice president of academic affairs and provost of Collin College, and additional faculty and administrative roles at UT Dallas, Pennsylvania College of Technology, Texas Wesleyan University, and Whitman College. Chesney earned a doctor of philosophy in English literature, a master of arts in creative writing, and a bachelor’s degree in Spanish.

His background has been a positive point of discussion among many members of the Clarke community. Some students have expressed excitement about his involvement in liberal arts programs. The press release issue by Clarke University also revealed that Chesney’s wife, Noelle, is also deeply involved in the arts—holding a doctorate of musical arts in vocal performance.

Hannah Ingles, a junior at Clarke who is currently studying Graphic Design, said, “I think his leadership has the potential to bring about some exciting opportunities for some of the arts programs at Clarke. I’m really excited to see what changes he makes in promoting programs like mine. I hope he’ll be an advocate for the fine arts—all of them.”

In Chesney’s time at Brookhaven, he attempted to encourage student enrollment, retention, and graduation rates. Additionally, according to Clarke University’s press release announcing his appointment, Chesney has also been a reliable and active member of his community. He served on the board of the Metrocrest Chamber of Commerce, which named him 2014 Citizen of the Year, and also took part in a number of other community programs.

Dr. Thom Chesney, along with his wife, Noelle, and two kids, Drew and Ellen, will be joining the Clarke community July 15th. Sister Joanne has stated that there are a few things she wants to complete before making her departure this summer, but is overall happy to pass the torch to Dr. Thom Chesney.

 

by Dane Shaull