Tag: students

Clarke University announces new president, Dr. Thom D. Chesney

On February 26th, Sister Joanne Burrows announced Dr. Thom D. Chesney as the new president of Clarke University. Burrows, who has been the president of Clarke University since 2006, announced she was going to be retiring from her position in July of 2018. Her announcement sparked a nationwide search and concluded with a unanimous vote from the Board of Trustees, electing Chesney as the 16th president of the university.

Thom Chesney photo

via Clarke University

According to a biography issued by Clarke University, Dr. Thom Chesney previously held the position of president at Brookhaven College of Dallas, TX. He also maintained a number of administrative positions at other surrounding universities and colleges around Texas. Among these are The University of Texas (UT) at Dallas, vice president of academic affairs and provost of Collin College, and additional faculty and administrative roles at UT Dallas, Pennsylvania College of Technology, Texas Wesleyan University, and Whitman College. Chesney earned a doctor of philosophy in English literature, a master of arts in creative writing, and a bachelor’s degree in Spanish.

His background has been a positive point of discussion among many members of the Clarke community. Some students have expressed excitement about his involvement in liberal arts programs. The press release issue by Clarke University also revealed that Chesney’s wife, Noelle, is also deeply involved in the arts—holding a doctorate of musical arts in vocal performance.

Hannah Ingles, a junior at Clarke who is currently studying Graphic Design, said, “I think his leadership has the potential to bring about some exciting opportunities for some of the arts programs at Clarke. I’m really excited to see what changes he makes in promoting programs like mine. I hope he’ll be an advocate for the fine arts—all of them.”

In Chesney’s time at Brookhaven, he attempted to encourage student enrollment, retention, and graduation rates. Additionally, according to Clarke University’s press release announcing his appointment, Chesney has also been a reliable and active member of his community. He served on the board of the Metrocrest Chamber of Commerce, which named him 2014 Citizen of the Year, and also took part in a number of other community programs.

Dr. Thom Chesney, along with his wife, Noelle, and two kids, Drew and Ellen, will be joining the Clarke community July 15th. Sister Joanne has stated that there are a few things she wants to complete before making her departure this summer, but is overall happy to pass the torch to Dr. Thom Chesney.

 

by Dane Shaull

 

All I want for Christmas is to pass my exams

Ah, finals week. It’s much liked the countdown to Christmas, but instead of Holiday cheer, students are riddled with sleep-deprivation, over-caffeination, and stress. It’s the magical week where majors of all kinds collectively lose their heads over exams, projects, and papers.

Everyone goes into finals week with a different attitude. Some students may suffer from test anxiety, while others may feel their heartrates pickup at the thought of giving a speech. There are perfectionists and those that go with the flow– optimists, pessimists, and everything in between.

Regardless of what kind of student you may be, whether you strategize your time with amazing restraint—determined to get your work done, even if it means staying up all night every once and awhile—or whether you can’t find it in yourself to stay up past 10 p.m. anymore, it’s important to acknowledge the one variable that unites us all during these trying last few weeks of the semester.

We all care far too much.

We treat our grades and our GPA’s as the end all be all—and, for some of us, they are. These grades are the gateway to our degrees which we need in order to go out into the work force or into a higher degree of study. So, we chug our cups of coffee and energy drinks, we sacrifice our mental health to our textbooks and notes, we go to bed at 3:00 a.m., and we panic all the while about whether or not we’re prepared enough.

The unfortunate truth is that most of us aren’t.

But we can be. Believe it or not, studying works wonders. If you find studying difficult, don’t be afraid to reach out for help. There are a number of different resources available for free use on campus, such as the MARC, the professors, and even other students. It may sound crazy, but everyone wants you to pass just as much as you do.

At the end of finals, when you turn in that last exam, when you give your final presentation, you’re free for the rest of 2018. Sure, you won’t know your grade for some time, but as long as you put in the work and give it your all, it doesn’t matter. You did all you could.

So enjoy your break and scrape together whatever holiday cheer you have left, because you deserve to relax. You worked hard this semester. You deserve this break, because if you’re coming back next semester? Who knows when you’ll get another chance to sleep for an entire month.

Happy Holidays, and Merry Finals!

 

By Maggie Christianson

How long does it take to cook a turkey in the microwave? The answer is: you don’t

Thanksgiving—an entire holiday dedicated to turkey, football, and Macy’s. Since we’re just on the verge of taking a break from school to head back home for the holidays, we thought it’d be appropriate to address the internet’s most recent trend. About a week ago, a new meme emerged on Twitter, highlighting the exasperated nature of mothers nationwide. An enormous number of young adults sent loving messages to their moms asking how they might cook a 25lb Butterball turkey in the microwave. Seems like a fantastic idea, right?

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Via @Cassidy_OMealia

Of course, no young adult is actually attempting to nuke an entire bird till it’s cooked through. This meme is more about the frighteningly similar responses of each of these college student’s mothers. The reactions range from concerned to deeply disappointed.

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Via @russelldpowell

One of our own editors attempted this harmless prank and sent a message to her mom. Only minutes later, our editor was FaceTiming with her mother, receiving a firm reprimand. While there is nothing more powerful than a mother’s love, it seems that a Butterball turkey in the microwave might be the breaking point of a mother’s patience.

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Via @TheClarkeCrux

Have you attempted this viral turkey prank? If so, send us the screenshots of your parent’s responses on Twitter @TheClarkeCrux!

by Staff

Stan Lee, Marvel Comics icon, passes at 95

This past Monday on November 12th, Marvel mogul Stan Lee passed away at the age of 95. The creator of iconic superheroes like Spider-man, Hulk, Wolverine and so many more was beloved by generations—from adult comic lovers to young Marvel movie fans.

Lee began his career in the comic industry during a tumultuous time in the country. Starting at the Timley Comics company in the year of 1939, Lee began his career in the industry as nothing more than an office assistant. As time went on, he became more interested in comics, sticking with the publisher even when it underwent a name change in 1960. The new name of the company?  Marvel Comics. In an attempt to keep up with D.C. Comics after they received a huge popularity boost with the introduction of Justice League, Lee created the Fantastic Four, changing the comics industry forever. 1

Stan Lee also aided in the development of Captain America, one of Marvel’s most famous characters, who served as a hopeful symbol to the United States in a time of war. Lee was the writer who introduced the iconic shield as Captain America’s weapon of choice, which now acts as one of the defining characteristics of the hero.

Once Marvel comics made the transition to screen, Stan Lee was introduced to younger audiences through a number of cameos—appearing in nearly every Marvel film as a random, often eccentric unnamed character. Audiences were always delighted to see him on screen, sometimes going so far as to clap during viewings when he showed up in the plot. Though his life has come to an end, his legacy will continue to live on as the Marvel franchise endures.

 

 

1 Source https://www.nbcnews.com/pop-culture/pop-culture-news/stan-lee-creator-legendary-marvel-comic-book-superheroes-dies-95-n819371

Image Sourced at https://variety.com/2018/biz/news/stan-lee-hospitalized-hospitalization-1202685164/

The Impact of College Athletics at Clarke

A student body is a critical aspect to any university. Without students, a university has no way to sustain itself– and for smaller schools like Clarke University, students are of an even greater importance. The student body here at Clarke is made up of nearly 70% athletes according to the university’s website, suggesting that Clarke needs to market themselves primarily to athletes and attract them to the athletic programs at Clarke. This year, Clarke finished a construction project on two new practice fields that football, soccer, and lacrosse all use.

These two fields have jump-started the four-million dollar project for athletic facilities on the Clarke campus, according to Athletic Director Curt Long. The new turf fields, just finished this August, are great recruiting tools for Clarke Athletics. Additional upgrades to Clarke’s sports facilities include a weight room, fitness area, and locker rooms constructed on the ground level of the Kehl Center. Various athletic programs are available, including volleyball, soccer, golf, baseball, basketball, bowling, cross country, football, lacrosse, track and field, and soccer.

So how does Clarke University actually manage to reach athletic students not only across the U.S. but internationally as well? For Kevin Hunley, a senior baseball player, Clarke jumped onto the starting right fielder’s radar when Dan Spain, the head baseball coach, sent him an email. Inside the correspondence, Spain said exactly what Kevin wanted to hear from a potential college.

Being from a large city where his high school actually had more students than Clarke University, Kevin said, “Coming to a school like this was different. As a high schooler you always see college as some new massive experience. Although Clarke may lack the student population, they make up for it in other ways.” Kevin was attracted to Clarke’s smaller size and, through the encouragement of Coach Spain, decided to experience Clarke and all it had to offer.

While explaining the differences in between his hometown of Glendale, Arizona and Dubuque, Kevin also stated, “There are kids everywhere in the U.S. looking for a place to continue their dream.” All it took for Kevin to commit the next four years of his life to this university was an encouraging email from Coach Spain. Kevin believes the west coast has many students just like him waiting for an email like that from an encouraging coach offering an enticing place to play.

In regards to his academic. He stated, “They really want you to succeed and are willing to work with you. The professors want you to be successful and try to help in any way they can.”

Senior pitcher Chelsea Fogarty has attended Clarke University all four years of college. Chelsea was recruited by a coach that is no longer in employment at Clarke. She spoke about this coach recruiting her starting in her sophomore year of high school.

The persistence of this coach and the fact that, “he made me feel important” encouraged her to become part of the Clarke Pride. She visited three times before verbally committing. Chelsea said, “Other schools had my attention, including Tennessee and a Division Two college in southern Illinois.” The coach that began recruiting her was her main reason for attending. In addition, the nursing program, the friendly Dubuque community, and being close to home helped seal the deal.

Clarke’s athletic teams have been more successful in the past few years, promoting Clarke in an even more positive way. “Athletics here at Clarke are a major component to the success of the university. With more success, we’re going to draw more attention from future athletes,” stated Chelsea. Being in the north, Clarke does present some cold temperatures for athletics. The baseball and softball fields are located 20 minutes from campus, which can be a strain for some students.

Chelsea stressed the pain it can be to drive 20 minutes off campus to a practice field, and with some students not having cars, they can run into difficulty with carpooling and transportation at times.

The student athletes appear to support each other well and the school spirit and comradery seem to overcome even the coldest of temperatures and distance to fields. Both Clarke athletes talked about the connection they felt to the coaches recruiting them. Relationships and connections appear to be a convincing component for athletic recruitment at Clarke University according to senior soccer player Trevor Kennedy, a men’s soccer player at Clarke. Clarke University and the wider area of Dubuque both offer a strong sense of connection and community, drawing student athletes from many corners of the U.S. and abroad.

 

By Austin Mettica

Mental Illness in College

We all know that college is a time of new experiences. College is really a test, it gives us a taste of the real world and at some points slaps us with reality. While going through college we learn a lot about ourselves that we didn’t know before, and one of those things is how well we can handle the stress of the real world. With the constant studying, assignments and impending due dates, college students commonly become overwhelmed and cannot handle the pressure of higher education. This can leads to mental health issues.  Mental health is defined as “Emotional, psychological, and social well-being. It affects how we think, feel, and act. It also helps determine how we handle stress, relate to others, and make choices,” (1). Throughout college students will commonly test the limits of their mental health and will potentially end up pushing themselves to the point of developing a mental illness. It is important for students to understand the importance of taking care of their mental health and to know how to when it is time to seek help when they need it.

The most common mental health issues found in college students are suicide and depression, stress and anxiety, addiction, eating disorders, bipolar disorder, ADHD,  and sleep disorders (2). There are many signs that can help determine mental health conditions before they worsen; unusual sleeping habits, low energy and ambition, change in hygiene habits, thoughts of harming yourself or others,  as well as feelings of worthlessness, helpless or hopeless feelings, and changes in appetite. When these signs are experienced its best to reach out to a counselor or advisor to seek help before it gets too out of hand.

An anonymous professor at Clarke University explained that he thought the most strenuous part about being in college that affects mental health is students being on their own. He explained that parents are not teaching kids to function on their own before they are thrown into the complexity of college. He explained that as a parent it is their responsibility early on to teach children the basics of independence. When asked for advice on how to help students deal with the struggles of sustaining mental health he recommended analyzing your week. Most college students when mapping out their week have too much leisure time, do not spend enough time studying or doing homework. For example, if you have four hours of free time, spend two hours studying then play video games. He also said that students feed themselves negative thoughts, in which he provided a hand out which allows for an individual to assess or challenge the negative thoughts in order to prevent them from altering one’s mental health. One would believe that the drop out rate would be high considering the stress that college can put on one with mental health issues, and this professor agrees. He stated that between three and four years ago about 5-10 psychology majors dropped out at Clarke during the spring semester because of depression and anxiety disorders. As a college educator, he has seen students experience mental health issues first hand. In his experience he said the most common signs of mental health issues that he has seen consist of continuous absences from class, late work, previously stellar work to more poor-quality work and the physical appearance of the student is different, students have baggy eyes, poor complexion, look sloppy in overall appearance and lack overall hygiene.

Liz Schuler, a Clarke instructor believes that mental illness is seen as a stigma but has also seen the powerful affects of mental illness. She says that so far from her knowledge about 3 students have already dropped out this semester. What some may find surprising is that Clarke staff do not have to go through training to be informed about mental illness or how to help the students who are struggling.

Mental illness is a neglected topic that most individuals are unknowledgeable about. To those who deal with a mental illness, do not be afraid to reach out, college is a mess sometimes. You shouldn’t have to be. Your mental health is not a stigma, and you are not your mental illness.

By Alexis Decker`

2)“College Student Mental Health.” Psychology, www.learnpsychology.org/mental-health/.

1)“What Is Mental Health?” What Is Mental Health? | MentalHealth.gov,www.mentalhealth.gov/basics/what-is-mental-health.

Dubuque Police Monitor Social Media for Threats

 


The Dubuque police department monitors social media to track and respond to threats in the Dubuque area.

The police department will now focus some attention on social media in response to the alleged shooting threat directed toward Dubuque Senior High School on February 22. This allows the police department to not only respond quickly to confirmed threats but also to control any hearsay about discredited threats. The Dubuque community and its institutions benefit from the police department’s efforts to monitor social media.

For special circumstances, like the Dubuque Senior High School shooting threat, the police department will assign an officer to monitor social media for threats, according to Joe Messerich, a Lieutenant on the Dubuque police force. However, the police department does not staff specific police officers to oversee social media for threats. Instead, the police department has intelligence officers who gather vital information and relay it to the police officers.

Although, Lt. Messerich said all officers are expected to act as intelligence officers to find trends on social media – whether it involves underage house parties, gang-related posts, or possible threats – and relay the information to the department.

Another way officers monitor social media is during their own time when they are off-duty. If the officers peruse their social media accounts and come across something alarming, then they are expected to use their judgment to consider if it is a threat. “It doesn’t matter who you are,” said Lt. Messerich. “You’ll find information on something on social media.”

To report any threats, call the Dubuque police department at (563)589-4415 or Crime Stoppers at (800)747-0117.

Lt. Messerich said the now-discredited Dubuque Senior High School shooting threat was a rumor that “spread like wildfire” because social media users would share the story without any credible sources.

The rumor forced the police department to follow more leads and investigate more individuals, to which they dedicated one police officer to sift through social media for information on the possible shooting threat. This assigned officer would then contact people to see if the threats circulated were credible.

The Walk Out on March 14 was another circumstance that compelled the police department to monitor for threats. Those who participated in the Walk Out to protest gun violence left the safety of their school/building to march to Washington Park. The latter location is an open area which exposed individuals to possible threats; so, the police department had to take all precautions necessary to protect students and community members involved.

The police department monitored the “National Walk-Out Day – Dubuque” Facebook page and analyzed users’ comments to determine if they were possible threats. The police department needed a solid understanding of the threat-level during the Walk Out, and they turned their attention to Facebook to analyze the situation.

Lt. Messerich said, “We must know if 50 people from Loras or 2,000 people from the community are going to determine the level of safety.”

The police department monitoring social media for threats benefits the community and its institutions. Clarke University, a private Catholic university, benefits from the police department’s examination of social media.

Sister Joanne, Clarke University’s President, showed excitement and support for Dubuque monitoring social media. She said, “Lots of people and groups monitor social media. Clarke does. People are naïve if they think their texts and tweets and whatever are not being monitored. Given the pervasiveness of social media and the increased incidents of violence, I think the monitoring of social media by law enforcement is increasingly necessary.”

Sr. Joanne continued, “Such surveillance could provide our campus community with an advanced warning about a potential threat of violence or alert us to any abusive behavior being perpetrated by or directed at a member of our campus community.”

Laura Naber is a Clarke University student directly affected by the Dubuque Senior High School shooting threat.

Laura said, “As a student teacher at Dubuque Senior High School this year, I was affected by the supposed shooter threat in late February when classes were canceled for an entire day. While the administration and police handled the threat with the utmost concern and professionalism, the incident caused me to reflect on my future career in education and the influence of social media in the classroom and society.”

Laura continued, “While social media can be a great tool for communication, it has also become a negative pool where people post ignorant comments and bully others through an LED screen. Because this is becoming more and more of an issue, I think it is

important for police officers to monitor social media posts for potential violence and threats. If there are serious issues and concerns circulating the internet, law enforcement should be made aware so that immediate action and protection can be taken to avoid any detriment to innocent people.”

Caitlyn Ambrosy is a life-long Dubuque resident who attends Clarke University. She said, “In a society where social media is an ever-growing presence to which many believe there is a sense of anonymity and lack of consequences, a law enforcement presence is necessary. In the instance of the threat towards Senior High School, having a police presence on social media allowed for a quick, tactical, and thorough response to investigate the threat and protect the students.”

 

By Kyle Majerus

Pet Therapy Now Offered Twice a Week

At Clarke University, students now have the option to attend Pet Therapy two times a week, which can help reduce stress and anxiety.

In previous semesters, Pet Therapy met once a week on Wednesdays from 3 p.m. to 4 p.m. Due to popular demand, Pet Therapy now meets twice a week on Tuesdays and Wednesdays from 3 p.m. to 4 p.m., giving students more options to attend.

“Pet Therapy is now two days instead of one by popular demand by Clarke students” the student organizer of Pet Therapy, Laura, explained. “We put a vote on the university’s Twitter asking which day of the week students would prefer for another pet therapy slot, and the majority answered Tuesday. So, now it’s Tuesdays and Wednesdays, which is convenient for students who might be busier on one of those days, but still want to see a dog that week.”

dogIn further conversation, Laura stated, “Pets just make me feel calm and loved, and it’s so rewarding to love them back. They’re always a nice de-stressor because all they expect from you is pats and treats.”

“It makes me feel at home” Alex, a Clarke student explained. “Pets are a part of most people’s lives and helps many of us feel better overall. When I go to Pet Therapy, I can forget about all of my school work for the time being. I get to enjoy good company and the pets help reduce my stress levels.”

Laura explained her motivations for organizing Pet Therapy. “I understand how important it is for students to have a break throughout their week. Schoolwork and jobs and life can be insane, and I know how refreshing it is to look forward to an event that doesn’t involve high stress or responsibility.”

Multiple students explained that they can get more homework accomplished later by attending Pet Therapy after a day of classes.

“It gives our brains a rest after long hours of lectures in our classes. We get to de-stress while petting these pets and all of our worries temporarily go away” explained Kelsey, another Clarke student.

Many students agreed that being able to pet a dog in the middle of the day is a de-stressor and positive experience.

“The Pet Therapy program was something I had loved about Clarke since freshman year. I would make an effort every week to try and see the dog that was coming” Laura said. “Taking time, even if it’s just passing by on the way to your dorm room, to pet a happy dog is just so calming. Pet therapy can even be the highlight of someone’s day.”

“I’m glad Pet Therapy is now offered on Tuesdays. I always had a class from 3 to 4:15 on Wednesdays and never got the option to attend. Now I can attend on Tuesdays when I don’t have a late class” Alex explained.

As a consensus, students at Pet Therapy on Tuesday agreed that Pet Therapy was a way to break up their long day of classes and the homework that had to be done that night.

 

By: Kelli Peterson

 

*Pictures curtsey of Kelli Peterson and Clarke University

CUDM Kicks Off Year 3

By: Caroline Herrig

Dance Marathon is an organization that supports the University of Iowa Stead Family Children’s Hospital, and this is Clarke’s third year of hosting their own Dance Marathon event.

This organization works throughout the school year to raise funds and awareness for the hospital, and at the end of the year at the “big event”, the total amount of money raised is revealed to all of the members and dancers who helped raise it! In the past two years, Clarke Dance Marathon, an entirely student-run organization, has raised over $25,000 and with that money, was able to purchase a prep/recovery room at the hospital that is named after Clarke’s program.

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Kaitlynn Pate, one of CUDM’s Co-Presidents, expressed how critical each and every member and dancer is to the success of the organization.

“It is amazing to me that college students can make such an impact on the lives of those treated at the University of Iowa Stead Family Children’s Hospital. We are all part of a movement that is larger than all of us participating combined. We are the face to end pediatric illness,” Pate stated.

This year, the organization has been especially busy with fundraising, as the goal this year is to raise $20,000, all of which goes directly to the hospital to provide things like meal tickets for families during their stay, toys/gifts for the kids, as well as funding for research for pediatric illnesses.

The executive committee has also been working to ensure the big event runs smoothly, and has been working to schedule entertainment for the event such as dodgeball, karaoke/lip sync battles, minute-to-win-it games, a bounce house, Zumba, therapy dogs, plus more! All of these activities are free for Dance Marathon committee members and dancers to participate in. The only hard part, is that there is no sitting or caffeine allowed during the 8 hour event. This is a way for the Dance Marathon members to take on the struggles that the kiddos at the hospital regularly face.

Most importantly, at the big event, the miracle families that are the face of the Clarke Dance Marathon program are given the opportunity to share their stories of their experiences with the hospital for all of the members and dancers to hear. These stories are shared throughout the event to serve as a reminder of what all of the hard work is for. Chelsea Pierce, CUDM’s Family Relations Director, stated, “I have never met and gotten to know stronger families than our CUDM miracle families. They let our organization into their lives and let us become a part of their families. They share with us their difficult times, and our organization helps life them up.”

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CUDM’s big event is held on Saturday, April 14th from 4 pm – midnight, and is held in the Kehl Center on campus. Dancers can still register for the event, and donations can be made now, through the duration of the event. If you would like to register, donate, or learn more about Dance Marathon and the University of Iowa Stead Family Children’s Hospital, you can visit clarke.edu/dancemarathon.

Zoey Weber: Saving Lives in Texas

zoeySummer of 2017 seems like a distant memory now, doesn’t it? We’ve already been back in school for a few weeks and loaded with homework. But some of us worked hard all summer too, furthering our education for our future careers. I’ll admit I enjoyed many days with my toes dipped in the pool and soaking up the sun. My dear friend, Zoey Weber, a student of the class of 2018, was busy saving lives. She made the move to Texas this summer to further her nursing skills and training with a summer internship. Let’s take a look at what she has to say about her experience.

She told me how growing up in Dubuque area and being familiar with the resources around her gave her the opportunity to work at Finley Hospital as a tech in the Family Birthing Suites since high school. She loves the environment she works in and plans to be a labor and delivery nurse at a larger hospital in Texas after graduation. Her dream is to continue her education and become a midwife.

Zoey loves Dubuque, however, she personally feels she would gain more experience in a big city like Dallas or San Antonio. The state of Texas is very dear to her heart. In hopes of pursuing this dream, Zoey applied for multiple nursing internships for the summer of 2017 in Texas. After a little bit of the waiting game, she received a call from St. Luke’s Hospital offering her an interview for a nursing internship. Zoey made the journey to Texas and had a successful interview. She got the internship! The internship was nine weeks long at CHI in St. Luke’s Hospital, which is considered the largest medical center in the United States. She split her time working with a nurse preceptor on the surgical floor and working in the ICU during the second half of the internship.

The excitement, nerves, and readiness for this new adventure filled her. Immediately she began looking for apartments or places to stay. The scary part for her was that she didn’t know many people in Texas and realized she was really her my own making adult decisions. Perhaps she didn’t find the nicest place of them all to stay, but thankfully her best friend gave me a care package with scorpion spray to ward off any creepy crawlers who might want a place to stay in Zoey’s apartment.

Another new experience and somewhat of a challenge for Zoey was the public transportation. The hospital did not have parking for its employees, which meant she would be taking the public train system to and from work. Although public transportation is beneficial, she witnessed some interesting events on the train rides that she does not want to see again.

Maybe there were a few setbacks and things to adjust to, but the internship provided Zoey with such a life-changing education and experience. Who knew one could learn so much over the course of nine weeks? Because she worked in labor and delivery back home, she felt nervous being placed in the oncology unit for the first half of the internship. This hospital, being a medical center, has many trials and many basics that she will need for a career. Zoey expressed how she felt so lucky to be able to learn in this setting. She got to place IVs every day, drew the entire floors lab work every morning, did lots of dressing changes, and much more.

The absolute craziest moment of this internship was when one of Zoey’s patient’s heart stopped while she was alone with the patient! Zoey calmly called a code to get help, but still needed to resuscitate the man with the help of two other CNAs while they waited for the doctor to arrive. They had the patient back to life before the doctor arrived, and it was the most intense moment of Zoey’s nursing career thus far.

Her internship also took a change of course this summer. She planned on moving to the ICU for the second half of the internship, but due to matters out of her control, she instead got offered a position with the rapid response team within the hospital. They assist when there are patients who have heart attacks, strokes, and need resuscitation. So, needless to say, many more intense and educational experiences are now under her belt from the time with the rapid response team.

Zoey is beyond grateful for the experiences she had in Texas at St. Luke’s this summer and learned so much. Now she feels so prepared to do her ER and ICU clinicals with the nursing program at Clarke this fall. There were both trials and tribulations, but she would do this again in a heartbeat. Zoey looks forward to her senior year as a nursing student, and she’s excited to move to Texas after graduation and work as a full-time nurse down south.

Clarke University is proud to have students like Zoey Weber. I am proud to call her my friend.

Unfortunately, right after Zoey returned home from the beautiful state of Texas, Hurricane Harvey hit. It was shocking that the place she lived in all summer and grew to love very much was now under water and mass destruction. If you are interested, please click the link below to donate to the hurricane relief in Texas. Thank you.

https://www.redcross.org/donate/hurricane-harvey

 

By: Megan Kane